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37

I'm reasonably sure the only person other than Frodo who Tolkien mentions being stabbed with a Morgul-blade is Boromir, a Steward of Gondor. The section of Appendix A to Lord of the Rings about the Stewards says: In the last years of Denethor I the race of uruks, black orcs of great strength, first appeared out of Mordor, and in 2475 they swept across ...


20

Then Beren was aware in his dream of a form that came to him across the water, and it was a wraith of Gorlim; and it spoke to him declaring his treachery and death... (src: The Silmarillion) What corrupted him? He was killed by Sauron after betraying his company. Yet men said that the horn was still heard at times in the Deep and the wraith of Helm (...


17

It almost happened to Frodo: Pippin declared that Frodo was looking twice the hobbit that he had been. “Very odd,” said Frodo, tightening his belt, “considering that there is actually a good deal less of me. I hope the thinning process will not go on indefinitely, or I shall become a wraith.” “Do not speak of such things!” said Strider quickly, ...


12

As I understood it the reason that Frodo was in danger was because a fragment of the morgul blade snapped off and remained in his body, working its way towards his heart. In the books it is mentioned that at that point he would have become a wraith and was only saved because Elrond removed the fragment. This would not necessarily happen in all cases though, ...


7

Tolkien used the term barrow-wight for wraiths who inhabit and defend tombs. Also, the oathbreakers, Aragorn's army, are much like wraiths as well. Each of these character types are trapped between life and the after life.


5

I've been unable to find any direct quotes from episodes or interviews that would indicate the Wraith are the basis for vampire mythology on Earth. However, as you stated, that is most likely the intent of the show's creators. At one point Sheppard (or was it McKay?) refers to them as "space vampires", but in-universe that comment would obviously have been ...


4

My understanding of it is that if the person stabbed does not have a ring of power, he will die, however if he/she does, then the blade has a sort of corrupting and enhancing power on the ring.


4

Existance of Barrow Wights is connected with necromancy; from Morgoth's Ring of the History of Middle-earth series: But it would seem that in these after-days more and more of the Elves, be they of the Eldalie in origin or be they of other kinds, who linger in Middle-earth now refuse the summons of Mandos, and wander houseless in the world, ...


3

Sauron gave 9 rings to 9 powerful leaders of Men. These 9 all became Ring Wraiths upon their deaths because of the Rings. Frodo being the Ringbearer, if he would have died while holding the ring would have become a Wraith as well. Further if Frodo would have died due to to wound inflicted by the Nazgul, he would have been subservient to the Nazgul as a ...


3

I am not sure if Lord of the Rings Online is considered for canon, but there are many wraiths besides the 9 Ringwraiths in that narrative. Wraiths are able to convert those they sap the life from into wraiths themselves, so from this I would assume many wraiths have existed in Middle-Earth. In addition to the Nazgûl, the Cargûl (Sindarin for "Red Wraith") ...


2

Note that fragment of the Morgul-blade snapped off and remained in his body. The remaining part of blade "seemed to melt and vanished like a smoke in the air". This weapon almost certainly may be used only once and probably is troublesome in storage (destroyed by light) and hard to produce. Therefore producing new wraiths, probably far less powerful than ...


2

My understanding is that there were wraiths... and then there were wraiths. The Nazgul were powerful and feared as wraiths because of the rings they possessed. But a typical person who became a wraith would exist only as spirit, with little ability to influence the physical world.


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