Hot answers tagged

302

It's helpful to consider in context of the time. Rationings were in effect in WWII England, and Turkish Delights were a particular delicacy that was popular at the time and hard to come by. Also consider that food in general was less sugar packed than many of the options we have today, so many foods at the time that we might consider "disappointing"...


30

It should be remembered that until Edmund asked for Turkish delight, Jadis had very likely never heard of it at all, and so the enchantments she used to create it were running on his ideas about it. It was already Edmund's favorite candy (or he would have asked for whatever his favorite candy was and we would be talking about that), and he could have been ...


19

Legends: The bat-falcon was a swift species of flying creatures. It inspired the name of the starship Millennium Falcon. http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Bat-falcon http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Millennium_Falcon_(novel) The snow falcon was an avian native to Rhinnal. http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Snow_falcon The spire falcon was a bird native ...


12

Microgravity may reduce tumor development According to research done through NASA, The secretion of cytokines was down-regulated in space. The inducers of tumor neoangiogenesis OPN, IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF-a were all reduced under real microgravity. Several gravisensitive signaling elements, such as protein kinases A and C as well as integrins, are ...


11

No. (Answering the question "Did Disney or Sphero give Randall credit", not the title question, which is probably unanswerable). First, what was Randall's innovation? It was not putting a robot inside a ball. Here's a patent for a robotic ball filed June 15, 2000, eight years before the comic publication date. His innovation was figuring out how to attach ...


11

I have personally talked with Randall Monroe about this. The question you ask is a bit hard to answer because you have to ask what "based off of" actually means. Was XKCD the first to introduce to the world the concept of a robot? Obviously not. Was XKCD the first to introduce to the world the concept of a robot in a ball? No Was XKCD the first to ...


7

Beside the delightfullness of some brands of Turkish Delight according to some of those who have answered here, there is also the Turkishness of Turkish Delight to considered. If Communist Cookies, or Nazi Nougat, or Stalinist Sweets, or Enemy Eclairs, or Anarchist Apple Fritters, had been a popular band of candy or sweets when Lewis was writing, he might ...


7

The reason Edmund forgets his manners (and everything but stuffing as much candy in his mouth as fast as humanly possible) is not the fact that Turkish Delight is the greatest confection in existence, but the White Witch's magic: At last the Turkish Delight was all finished and Edmund was looking very hard at the empty box and wishing she would ask him ...


6

No. According to StarWars.com, Abrams envisioned the early design by himself. When it came time to create a new astromech droid for the first film of a new Star Wars trilogy, director J.J. Abrams started as anyone might: he made a sketch on a napkin. It’s a fitting beginning, considering the handmade, warm look and feel of Star Wars: The Force Awakens. The ...


6

The decision to live on an airplane was not due to health benefits. He believed he would live longer on an airplane because there were world governments and people that wanted to kill/imprison him. Or at least he believed that to be the case. He has made enough enemies that residing in a known location could lead to him becoming metabolically challenged, ...


4

Hairy wasn't using any criteria per se to restrict, narrow-down, or sort his lists for his depth-first search. XKCD has done this to emphasis the joke; a real depth-first algorithm should have some means of evaluating that the current branch is a dead end or unlikely to approach a solution. After all snakebites in general are not a likely medical emergency ...


3

It must be fairly okay to do so, because… they have. Granted one little scene in a movie isn't typically enough to write the whole process off as entirely safe… however. The practice of associating Star Trek's warp drive with Alcubierre is at once easy and incorrect. Apart from the implicit "science is magic" effect of faster-than-light travel anyway, ...


2

The only reason that he could not stop eating it is because it was enchanted. As I recall (having read the book recently, though I don't have it at hand now) there's a point where Edmund is looking longingly at the empty box, and the witch is not surprised, since the treats were enchanted.


2

The title of the story is "What Time Is It?". Sorry, don't recall the author.


1

Special Relativity's misinterpretation According to Special Relativity's Theory, the faster you go, slower your proper time is, and if you reach v=c, then dt=0. One could think that if you go faster than c, then you go back in time, however if you go faster than c, your proper time is not negative, but imaginary -- t * square root of (1 - v^2/c^2).


1

As a kid who watched this in the theatre, I can tell you my eight year old brain that knew from reading comic books that Superman travelled in time by flying faster than light, that we are watching the Earth from Superman's perspective. That's what I saw. I didn't see the earth's rotation reversed. The final moments when Superman appears to change direction ...


1

(This is not your simple run of the mill spoiler. Proceed at your own risk) In Episode 8: The Last Jedi: Further explanation


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible