25

No. The mountain was there long before Louis Wu had discovered the Ringworld. Fist of God was created by a moon-sized asteroid crashing into the surface of the Ringworld deforming it and penetrating through the surface of the material into a mountain that stretches into space, above the atmosphere. Fortunately for the residents of the Ringworld, because ...


21

There is ample evidence that the Ringworld is very old (millions of years); the evidence includes, for example, the level of divergence of the humanoids populating the Ringworld from Earthly humanity. However, there is also evidence of decay that cannot have been going on for nearly that long. Louis cites two specific elements of the decay that seem to be ...


21

The answer is a major spoiler in and of itself and who the Engineers are/were is another spoiler


19

Note: This answer is written in the form of a fictional, in-universe briefing document. I've done my best to keep the "facts" correct and sourced from the Ringworld novels, but this "document" is my own invention. The format of this answer is currently under discussion in meta. Navigating the Ringworld NOTE: THIS DOCUMENT IS CONFIDENTIAL, AND THE PROPERTY ...


15

Try the following sequence of novels (some are collections of short stories): Neutron Star (introduces many key ideas like Known Space, Outsider Hyperdrive, and the Puppeteers). World of Ptavv (reveals more about the ancient Slavers that ruled the Galaxy). Protector (the backstory of the Pak, which is crucial to many key points in Ringworld). Ringworld (...


15

A reaction drive is a weapon effective in proportion to it's efficiency. The in-universe origin can be traced back to the first contact between Humans and Kzin where (told in "The Warriors") and the subsequent Kzinti attempts to invade the solar system. Just now I'm not positive about where the phrase first appeared in text, but the Ringworld mention has ...


15

I've removed the spoiler markup since the OP has read the series. Fair warning. In chapter 15 of Ringworld's Children, the Pak protector Proserpina described how the Ringworld came to be. Of the flattened maps of various worlds she had this to say: "Stars that can generate extensive planetary systems form in clusters. There were stars with planets ...


14

Or they could have given the Ringwall a distinctive, irregular, zigzag rim, like mountain peaks, […] Well … they did, in fact. Have you forgotten the spill mountains? Lots of mountains, a lot higher than the Map of Mars (at least in Ringworld — They magically shrink in the later books.), with no indentations on the outside of the ...


11

This Bungie web page offers a quote from Nathan Bitner, one of Halo's early developers, which provides one answer: It's worth noting that though Halo takes place on a ring-shaped artificial world, the story, characters and world bear no relation whatsoever to Niven's excellent Ringworld novels. Still, we can at least look at the similarities between the ...


10

The key piece of information was the view from the map room the expedition discovered. The room displayed tapes from telescopes that offered an aerial view of the ringworld in the past. Fist-of-God mountain was not on the tapes, so the huge mountain must have appeared long after the ringworld was constructed and populated. There are no plate tectonics on ...


9

Yes. The Spill Mountain people discussed in Ringworld's Children lived on the "Spill Mountains" - as close to the the Ringworld walls you get - or at least as far up as was habitable - and it was described as cold, icy, and snowy. See Chapter 14, The Spill Mountain People. This probably had more to do with altitude, though.


6

Turns out it's Baedecker - "Fate of Worlds" p. 130 finally confirms this, after dropping lots of hints. a Conservative government is running the Fleet by this time so we don't know those Hindmosts. But at times during the "Fleet of Worlds" series, Nike, Achilles, and Baedecker all serve as Hindmost.


6

They could...but not completely. Tor.com on Sunflowers (on the 40th Anniversary of Ringworld) Even so, sunflowers will never take over the entire structure’s land area. Sunflowers need carbon dioxide to live and this comes from microbes and animals. There are no geological processes on the Ringworld to hold and recycle carbon dioxide, except the Spill ...


6

With respect to Niven, I don't think this is a valid claim. There's too much technology in Known Space for dumping planetary waste heat to be a serious problem. In one of the Peace Corben stories, "War and Peace", the kzin Buckminster suggests using transfer booths to take hot gases from the surface of Plateau and dump them into local space for ...


5

I can think of three reasons. Migration. On Earth, many species of migratory birds, turtles, fish and mammals return to rookeries and breeding grounds year after year. If you change the geography so that landmarks, food, water, ambient temperatures and other factors aren't what these animals expect, you will affect their development. Some species life ...


5

As explained in World of Ptavvs, the sunflowers are under the control of the Tnuctip, something that Kzanol is too dim to figure out but that Greenberg does. So whether they have a natural enemy is only one part of the question, and to an extent besides the point. They are artificial, and have a control interface. An enterprising hominid species simply ...


4

There isn't a ton of information around - from http://news.larryniven.net/concordance/main.asp?alpha=C#CityBuildercolonyworlds: City Builder colony worlds Ten planets in stellar systems in the vicinity of the Ringworld, reportedly colonized by the City Builders. [Spoiler alert: Ringworld] The Map Room in Heaven displayed ten globes; Louis Wu ...


4

Read the novel Protector first, if you haven't read it already. It contains backstory that is quite pertinent to the Ringworld books. Also, the story in Protector is directly continued and resolved in the Destroyer/Betrayer/Fate of Worlds trio of books. Read the Niven short stories "Borderland of Sol", "Neutron Star", "At the Core", and "Procrustes" ...


4

The actual answer is a major plot spoiler.


3

For interest, this question is discussed a little bit in this reddit thread but comes to no conclusion. That said, yes, there is no reason a slaver disintegrator could not destroy a GP hull. As I recall, the time period when GP was still manufacturing hulls was before they had found the disintegrators, so it would have been true at that time. Nonetheless, ...


3

There doesn't seem to be any difference at the poles. In fact, assuming a perfectly flat ring, the difference in the amount of light from the sun is actually very small, only a few fractions of a percent. The north and south parts should be colder, but not that much. Okay, for some math. Distances in millions of miles. (sqrt(.5^2+93^2)-93)/93=1....


3

In The Ringworld Throne, Niven gives us a little more detail on the Fist-of-God event- The Hive-Intelligence race is mentioned in The Ringworld Engineers, in a throw-away comment from the Hindmost. They don't appear in any of the stories so far.


3

Based on the Larry Niven passages that the "new" Protectors where trying to breed out Xenophobia from their blood lines, then the bringing of th Kzinti to the Ringworld would make perfect sense. They provided that Protectors with endless supply of "other" to experiment on and achieve their goal of non Xenophobia. Perhaps they saw the potential benefit of ...


2

There are two main oceans on Ringworld, each on opposite sides of the ring (separated by 180 degrees of arc). One ocean contains world maps from Known Space, the other one contains maps of the Pak home world. Either one of these oceans could be taken as a reference point for large-scale navigation. Seeing Protectors made Ringworld, it's only fitting to ...


2

The shadow squares produce maps (This was speculated by louis wu in the first book while in the map room) so in a way this acts as a navigation system if you had a portable device.


2

Structure - indeed. Forerunners etc more taken from P.Anthony's Cluster series. The troopers are more Starship Troopers with some 40k Ultramarine... lots of cross- pollination.


2

Actually there are a few specific similarities between the Halo structure and the Ringworld in Larry Niven's Ringworld series. One that struck out to me is the inclusion of a 'Map Room', which features prominently in the first Halo film and the second and third Ringworld books.


2

Yes I agree with Kyle Jones! I think there is way to many technology to not solve this problem even in a citizen way. What I think would be the easiest way would be stepping disks, since they use them for everything else why not that too? And Have a radiator fin sticking into an ocean or grid of superconductor cables, then have the fin half sticking out ...


2

In the novel The Ringworld Throne, the lower zones of the mountain wall are described having cold climate, but I doubt they would really be so in reality because: There is no water to form the ice; they are outside the reach of the atmosphere and so there is no water vapour that can condense and freeze At lower altitudes there may be some water vapour in ...


1

I'm tending to the conclusion that the Engineers had no explicit intention to use exactly the map as a way of visual representation. They just used present land structure of each copied planet "as is", though projected to the inner surface of Ringworld. They had to create some unique land structure anyway (since each inhabited planet has it). Sure they could ...


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