12

So it says in The Children of Húrin by Tolkien (and his son) that the Helm of Hador — also called the Dragon of Dor-lómin — was made by the smith Telchar, who had, ‘in defiance’, put ‘a gilded image of Glaurung the dragon’ on the crest.

It also says that ‘the hearts of the host of Hithlum were uplifted when they saw it towering high amid the battle’.

Why, though? Wasn’t Glaurung one of the most potent symbols of Morgoth’s power?

1
  • 3
    At the time the helm was made, Glaurung's only appearance had been as an immature dragon who was driven back by the Elves. If anything, he was a symbol of the ability to overcome Morgoth's power.
    – chepner
    Apr 1 '20 at 13:30
16

I think you answered your own question: defiance and also encouragement.

Why do Christians wear crucifixes, a potent symbol of state power over life and death?

Why do members of ethnic groups often call one another by a term of abuse used by another group?

They do so, in some way, to thumb their noses at something beyond their power to control or change. In this case, as you say: ‘the hearts of the host of Hithlum were uplifted when they saw it towering high amid the battle.

2

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.