2

In the film Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007), during a discussion at number 12 Grimmauld Place, we can see Arthur Weasley reading a document with the logo of the Ministry of Magic. Then we hear him tell Harry Potter:

This is very, very peculiar. It seems your hearing in the Ministry is to be before the entire Wizengamot.

The fact that Mr. Weasley works for the Ministry of Magic suggests that he is well-versed in Ministry legal concerns, therefore I'm curious why he feels the hearing is peculiar or strange.

Still image from Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007)

5
  • 7
    It's been said in the film by Dumbledore: because the highest court in the country has been summoned to rule over a menial case of a minor using magic.
    – Gae. S.
    Oct 11, 2023 at 22:09
  • 7
    Kind of like a parking ticket in front of the Supreme Court.
    – Jon Custer
    Oct 11, 2023 at 22:16
  • 9
    "Why, in the few short weeks since I was asked to leave the Wizengamot, it has already become the practice to hold a full criminal trial to deal with a simple matter of underage magic!’"
    – Valorum
    Oct 11, 2023 at 22:18
  • 2
    harrypotter.fandom.com/wiki/… - Typically the infraction would get a warning letter and little more
    – Valorum
    Oct 11, 2023 at 22:22
  • 4
    I'm struggling here to understand what you're asking. Literally the second sentence of the quote is Arthur explaining what he means by the first sentence!
    – AakashM
    Oct 12, 2023 at 12:50

2 Answers 2

9

It represented a change in policy to try cases of underage magic in front of the entire Wizengamot.

From Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Chapter 8, "The Hearing":

"Laws can be changed," said Fudge, savagely. "Of course they can," said Dumbledore, inclining his head. "And you certainly seem to be making many changes, Cornelius. Why, in the few short weeks since I was asked to leave the Wizengamot, it has already become the practice to hold a full criminal trial to deal with a simple matter of underage magic!" A few of the wizards above them shifted uncomfortably in their seats.

As others commented above, this is like dealing with a parking ticket in front of the Supreme Court.

0
0

As Dumbledore later states during the course of the hearing, it is obviously unusual to run a ful criminal trial in front of the whole Wizengamot only for a small case of underage magic. What would have made it more peculiar is that Harry had commited a far more serious crime two years prior to that incident and back then the accidental magic reversal squad had simply fixed it up without a trial whatsoever. I think it is therefore not ununderstandable that Mr Weasley found it peculiar that Harry is getting a trial in front of the whole Wizengamot (it is similar to if a teenager gets a whole trial in front of the jury in a court for saving someone's life in the muggle world).

The Ministry obviously just wanted a reason to expell and discredit Harry further, and this situation seemed like they hit the jackpot to them.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.