74

Harry was identified by McGonagall prior to the trial: Note, in his welcome speech, Dumbledore states: "Quidditch trials will be held in the second week of term" On Thursday of his second week*, when Harry snatches the Remembrall from Malfoy and is taken by McGonagall, he thinks: "Professor McGonagall was sweeping along without even looking at him; ...


70

To quote the book; "What did he catch the Snitch for?" Ron bellowed, even as he jumped up and down, applauding withhis hands over his head. "He ended it when Ireland were a hundred and sixty points ahead, the idiot!""He knew they were never going to catch up!" Harry shouted back over all the noise, also applauding loudly. "The Irish Chasers were ...


69

Yes. Quidditch is inherently flawed. It violates several important points of game theory. All players are not similar in importance. You have six players plus one additional add-on who does not interact, yet has a vital role. The actions of one player can dramatically overshadow everyone else. Again, the Seeker is the special, special snowflake. They ...


69

The Irish Seeker was about to catch it anyway. Krum didn't decide to catch the Snitch without prompting. When Krum caught the Snitch, the Irish Seeker had seen it and was going to catch it himself. Without either cheating, or otherwise playing unfairly, there was no good way to stop Lynch from catching the Snitch other than Krum beating him to it. “Look ...


69

Harry didn't do a Wronski Feint, he just did a normal feint. My feeling is that the key element of the famed Wronkski Feint is that it's basically a game of chicken with your opponent (and the ground). You pretend to have seen the snitch, you hurtle groundwards and, if you're lucky, your opponent will misjudge the pull-out and slam into the floor. Even if ...


69

While the theoretical purpose of Bludgers may indeed be to knock players off their brooms, in practice all they really do at Hogwarts is cause minor injuries. This can be seen from the exchange between Harry and Wood shortly after the quote you cite in your question: “Er — have the Bludgers ever killed anyone?” Harry asked, hoping he sounded offhand. ...


65

1) They kept size over skill because it was very effective for them in the past, and it seemed to beat most other teams even in the present. The Slytherin team was often in contention for the cup, even while Harry was at school. It also has a precedent in the real world - eg Alabama's football team. Let's look at the results of Slytherin that we know outside ...


57

Point difference This is made clear in Prisoner of Azkaban, where Harry has to defer catching the Snitch until Gryffindor has accumulated enough of a lead, otherwise Slytherin wins the cup: Slytherin was leading the tournament by exactly two hundred points. This meant (as Wood constantly reminded his team) that they needed to win the match by more than ...


57

I think the main issue is ironically, not Marcus Flint as captain, but Malfoy. There is something that you are overlooking in your base assumptions, which is that, while Slytherin have been losing to Gryffindor, they have been doing very well against other teams. Year 1 - Despite losing to Harry (winning the match with a catch, though the team itself was ...


55

I’m not sure this is really an answer as such, but it is at least an explanation, for what it’s worth (and MaxD suggested I turn my comment into an answer, so here goes). The reason seems to be because J.K. Rowling. For reasons known only to her (and/or her publishers, presumably), words that Rowling herself has invented and which pertain uniquely to the ...


54

The reaction in the books is in keeping with how people react to life threatening events in real sports. To give an example: consider crashes in Formula 1. As with most motorsports, dramatic, high-speed crashes are a regular part of Formula 1. Minor incidents happen almost every race, and there are usually several more serious incidents over the course of a ...


52

House-elf magic is different than wizards’. Any protection that Bludgers have from magical interference mightn’t work against house-elf magic, since house-elf magic is different than wizards’ magic. For example, both Hogwarts and the Dark Lord’s Horcrux cave are protected against wizards Apparating in and out, but house-elves still can - the protection ...


51

There's a whole (out-of-universe, and also in-universe) book on this subject: Quidditch Through the Ages. According to this book, the first game of what might be recognized as quidditch was played in the 11th century; some entries in a diary of the period describe some recognizable elements: Tuesday. Hot. That lot from across the marsh have been at it ...


51

Ron conceded 24 goals. It's correct to say that the only way you can score points in Quidditch is through scoring with the Quaffle or catching the Golden Snitch. Hufflepuff scored 240 points, therefore Ron conceded 24 goals. The emphasis in the quoted passage was on what the worst part of the match was (from a Gryffindor perspective). Ron's fourteenth save ...


50

Ok, I've found a quote from JKR: ES: How on earth did Fred and George know that Ireland would win and Bulgaria would get the Snitch? JKR: Well, I think that if you were really into Quidditch you could have predicted that. What they had - ES: But how can you predict that, because you don't know when the Snitch is going to show up. JKR: ...


49

It’s probably against the rules, and certainly very atypical. Professor McGonagall tells students that they can sign up for their house team by asking their Head of House to put them down for tryouts. She doesn’t say anything about playing for another’s. “Those wishing to play for their house Quidditch teams should give their names to their Heads of ...


48

As Valorum said, it's basically because she's a girl, but it's more involved than that. Ginny is the only girl and the youngest, so it's probably a bit of them being protective and a lot them not wanting her to hang around them because they think she's annoying. Ginny is the youngest Not wanting the youngest kids around is a common dynamic in mixed-age ...


48

Professional teams have standby players. Hogwarts teams also have reserves, but their usage is inconsistent. Harry's ex-captain, Oliver Wood, gets employed as a reserve. Oliver Wood, the old captain of Harry's house Quidditch team, who had just left Hogwarts, dragged Harry over to his parents' tent to introduce him, and told him excitedly that he had ...


46

Hagrid appears to be very well-loved by many of the past and present the students at Hogwarts. The books primarily focus on his friendship with the trio, but Hagrid is also friendly with Fred and George, for example, and hints of his relationship to other student abound. (Think of all the owls that came in from past students in support of Hagrid when he ...


46

I just came across the following in The Half Blood Prince, Chapter 11: Hermione's Helping Hand: As Harry had expected, the [Gryffindor Quidditch team] trials took most of the morning. Half of Gryffindor house seemed to have turned up, from first years who were nervously clutching a selection of the dreadful old school brooms, to seventh years who towered ...


46

Quidditch practice keeps the school's worst troublemakers busy and tired. It's a subtle tool for maintaining order at Hogwarts by enlisting the students' unknowing aid in their own policing. The benefits of this unspoken policy are made particularly evident in Order of the Phoenix when Umbridge bans Fred and George from the Gryffindor team. Snape is ...


44

I don't think another player MAY catch the Snitch. In Quidditch Through the Ages, page 29, it says: (FOUL) Snitchnip: All players but Seeker / Any player other than Seeker touching or catching the Golden Snitch I'm correcting my original answer -- Yes, it appears it must be the Seeker to catch the Snitch.


42

Its very interesting to see that this question brought out a plothole in HP. As Skooba mentions in his answer, Quidditch through the Ages mentions: In the case of injury, no substitution of players will take place. The Team will play on without the injured player. And I quite agreed to it until I came across something in the first HP book. To contradict ...


40

Yes There really isn't any question to the matter when you consider the surrounding Wizarding world. Hogwarts was one of 11 total Wizarding schools. Harry was consistently the best performing seeker at Hogwarts. Quidditch teams recruit directly from wizarding schools. (see: Krum, and a noted attempt to recruit Charley Weasley). So given that Harry was the ...


39

Yes, there was. When the Gryffindor team was getting thoroughly beat by Hufflepuff due to Harry being banned from the team, Ginny caught the Snitch but Gryffindor still lost by ten points. “The miracle was that Gryffindor only lost by ten points: Ginny managed to snatch the Snitch from right under Hufflepuff Seeker Summerby’s nose, so that the final ...


38

There's actually a quote to answer that very question. In the third book, when the Firebolt is taken by the teachers to be examinated for hexes, Wood suggests that Harry could buy a Nimbus 2001. However... “Bad news, Harry. I’ve just been to see Professor McGonagall about the Firebolt. She—er—got a bit shirty with me. Told me I’d got my priorities wrong. ...


34

The team was worried Harry might have died from so high a fall. In addition to the unusual circumstances that caused Harry to fall, he’d also fallen from high up, and his teammates thought he had died from it. They were likely more concerned in this case than in other cases of falling off a broom because of how serious it could have been. “It was as ...


32

I don't think so, but it's possible. I'm fairly sure that Quidditch Through the Ages here is describing professional Quidditch referees (Chudley Cannons, etc). That wouldn't necessarily apply to school referees. I think that Snape was simply refereeing because Dumbledore wanted him to protect Harry. Still, it is possible. What we know of Professor Snape'...


31

Though it's true that Quidditch seems flawed, that may be the wrong question to ask. The real question is: does the unreasonable structure of the game make it a flaw in the world of the books? I don't think so: after all, the wizard world has many aspects that are satirical or frankly farcical; it's a place of commonplace fantasy, general whimsy, and ...


30

Scrimgeour says: "A Snitch is not touched by bare skin before it is released, not even by the maker, who wears gloves. It carries an enchantment by which it can identify the first human to lay hands upon it, in case of a disputed capture." -- Rufus Scrimgeour, The Will of Albus Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows "Lay hands upon ...


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