12

I'm not sure this is ever addressed in the books, but would chocolate made by Muggles work against the effects of Dementors, or would only wizard/witch produced chocolate have an effect? Why or why not?

7

It's not addressed directly in any of the books or JKR as far as I can find. That said, I think there's an argument for the existence of magical chocolate.

I think it's possible that wizarding chocolate may contain a magical component. That said, if chocolate does contain a magical element, we can't automatically assume that the magical component is what actually counteracts the Dementors. I think it's highly probable that any magical element in wizarding chocolate would indeed be what counters a Dementor's effects, though.

In Order of the Phoenix, following the Dementor attack in Little Whinging on Harry and Dudley, chocolate isn't even brought up -- not by Harry, Arabella Figg, Mundungus Fletcher, Arthur Weasley, Dumbledore, or Sirius. Perhaps it was because Harry had no access to wizarding chocolate; it could be that Muggle chocolate -- all that Harry would have had access to at Privet Drive -- was the wrong kind of chocolate to treat a Dementor attack with. (Ironically, in Order of the Phoenix, Harry threw away two boxes of Honeyduke's chocolate before the Dementor attack because he was feeling angsty and mad that no one was contacting him)

There is canon premise for magical ingredients being used in sweets. For example, Billywigs (FBAWTFT¹ page 4) are Australian insects that cause a pleasant floating sensation when they sting; Billywigs are the active ingredient in Fizzing Whizbees. The Glumbumble is a grey, furry-bodied flying insect that produces melancholy-inducing treacle, which is used as an antidote to the hysteria produced by eating Alihotsy leaves (FBAWTFT page 19).

Blending potions has a magical aspect it to it. Perhaps wizarding candy is similar and does too. It seems unlikely that Lupin went into the Muggle world just to procure Muggle chocolate, even less so that Madam Pomfrey would have (she had chocolate on hand in the hospital wing in Prisoner of Azkaban). Dementors are of the magical world; it would seem that to counter their effects would require some kind of magic (whether that's the regular chocolate, a magical ingredient, or both).

So, do we know for sure counteracting the Dementors requires magically-produced chocolate? No. Is it a possibility? Yes.

¹Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them - Newt Scamander - Scholastic Edition

  • 1
    I'm pretty sure the first or second time Lupin gives chocolate to Harry in Prisoner of Azkaban, he says something like, "It's just chocolate!"... – Izkata May 10 '12 at 23:38
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    He says, "I haven't poisoned that chocolate, you know." It's not specified what kind of chocolate Harry is given on the train or by Madam Pomfrey, but when he's practicing his Patronus, it specifically says Lupin gives Harry a Chocolate Frog and a slab of Honeyduke's best chocolate. :) – Slytherincess May 11 '12 at 0:17
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    Um... big mistake... "Muggle chocolate -- all that Harry would have had access to at Privet Drive" - is a false premise. Any chocolate in Privet drive may only exist in past tense as it's all already been eaten by Dudley. Harry wouldn't have had access to ANY chocolate in Privet – DVK-on-Ahch-To May 11 '12 at 5:02
  • It's not a false premise that should Harry have chocolate provided to him by any Muggle on Privet Drive that the chocolate would likely be Muggle. Unless you envision Aunt Petunia making stealth visits to Honeyduke's. And Harry did have access to chocolate, as I mentioned in my answer -- he just threw it away in a fit of pique. So it's not quite correct that Harry didn't have access to chocolate at all. He spent the summer wandering around; he could have accessed chocolate if he wanted, I believe. Also, Dudley was dieting successfully by the time OOTP opens. He had become a boxing champ. – Slytherincess May 11 '12 at 7:34
  • @Slytherincess, Lupin reccomended Chocolate Frogs and Honeyduke's because they're wizarding branded chocolate and prboably the first ones that naturally sprang to mind, him being a wizard. – kidragakash Feb 9 '15 at 13:35
10

I don't think there was ever any implication made that Lupin's or Madam Pomfrey's chocolate was a special "wizard" chocolate - it was therefore likely a regular unenchanted muggle chocolate.

As noted in the comment by gnovice, this question explores the reasons why Muggle chocolate might work: Is there a scientific basis for the healing properties of chocolate?

No mention of chocolate in that context in any of JKR sources.

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    What I mean by "wizard" chocolate is, for example, Honeyduke's slabs of chocolate. – Kogitsune May 10 '12 at 16:57
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    @Kogitsune - was there a difference other than who sold it? "Russian components, American components, ALL MADE IN TAIWAN!" – DVK-on-Ahch-To May 10 '12 at 17:39
  • It probably comes down to the process or any additives, which I really don't think the books mention. Given the magical nature of other sweets that are produced, I wondered if there was anything "magical" about their chocolate other than just being made by magic users compared to mundane muggle chocolates. – Kogitsune May 10 '12 at 18:04
5

There does not seem to be a need "wizard-made" chocolate... The chocolate itself is magic (1)!

The mood-enhancing properties of chocolate are well known in both the Muggle and wizard worlds. Chocolate is the perfect antidote for anyone who has been overcome in the presence of Dementors, which suck hope and happiness out of their surroundings.

Chocolate can only be a short-term remedy, however. Finding ways to fight off Dementors – or depression – are essential if one is to become permanently happier. Excessive chocolate consumption cannot benefit either Muggle or wizard.

Dementors and Chocolate By J.K. Rowling

(1) By magic, I mean the power to make one feel better is the chemicals it naturally contains!

  • Great find. This seems to suggest by WoG that there is no distinction between Wizard Chocolate and Muggle Chocolate – DBPriGuy Sep 22 '16 at 19:20
  • @DBPriGuy It wasn't so much of a find as it was published today on Pottermore! Hence the lateness of the answer. TBH though it is the shortest writing she has released there. It sounds more like a PSA to me. /shrug – Skooba Sep 22 '16 at 20:20

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