New answers tagged

9

The books don't mention specific categories of limitations for Felix Felicis. In this answer I discussed at length what Felix Felicis actually can and can't do. In short, it seems to primarily give the user extra confidence and help them make good decisions (possibly through some sort of insight into the near future), and arguably makes them actually "lucky"....


1

I believe that you cannot. Felix Felicis is described as making an ordinary day extraordinary. This and I believe its other descriptions all describe it as lasting a short period of time. Contrary to that, it takes six months to brew. Now it doesn't say if that six months is merely letting it sit there or if additions, modifications, and other tasks are ...


8

Well-cast Imperius Curses aren’t visible. Once the Imperius Curse is cast sufficiently well, it’s very difficult to tell if someone is under it. The only way the Ministry suggests to figure out if someone is under the Imperius Curse is by noticing them acting strangely. “5. Should you feel that a family member, colleague, friend or neighbour is acting in ...


3

Percy’s trouble was not for not noticing that Crouch was under the Imperius Curse. From Chapter Four of Order of the Phoenix (my emphasis): Though he knew perfectly well that Percy was highly ambitious, Harry’s impression was that Percy had not made a great success of his first job at the Ministry of Magic. Percy had committed the fairly large oversight ...


0

To add to Arcanist Lupus's answer, everybody knew that it was Voldemort, but were too afraid to speak out or ask about it. We see this when Lupin says: “Naturally many people have deduced what has happened: There has been such a dramatic change in Ministry policy in the last few days, and many are whispering that Voldemort must be behind it. However, ...


2

a) Percy clearly didn't get in that much trouble, as he continued to climb the ranks of the Ministry in the later three books. b) Since when has the Ministry shown any objections to blaming random scapegoats for the problems they wished to ignore? c) Public events are very different from close personal interactions. There may be a lot of scrutiny, but it'...


Top 50 recent answers are included