13

No, they don't find that evidence... but they muck up the search for it pretty early. One of the earliest terraforming ideas and attempts in Red Mars involves dropping wind turbines on a bunch of spots that will generate heat, and provide an (extremely slow) warming affect on the atmosphere to contribute to the general altering of the environment. It's not ...


9

Yes and no. It was planned to be a single novel at first, but grew into a trilogy. During writing research went on in parallel continuously. When I started writing it, I'd wanted it to be a big novel, a door-stopper, a thousand-page book. 1) So it indeed was intended, planned for, to be written as a single novel in one go. But KSR's writing style ...


8

There were two main reasons, I think. First, Frank and John had political differences in how they viewed the proper evolution of humanity on Mars. Oversimplifying greatly, John wanted to leave Earth behind and create a New Mars Human while Frank felt that this was utopian nonsense and that Mars must engage politically with Earth to assure a good future for ...


7

They're made up. Just try Googling for those terms, and you won't find what you'd expect to find if they were actual indicators in current use. Unusually for SF authors, Robinson postulates advances in soft sciences like economics and sociology as well as in hard sciences.


6

I don't think there's ever any evidence of contemporary native Martian life. There is a line in Blue Mars that says: Scientists working for the metanats had concentrated on resource exploration and evaluation, and had found signs of ancient oceans, of the early warm wet atmosphere, possibly even of ancient life.


5

In the very end of the entire series - very end - Ann comes near to death, and then sees an older Asian woman flying a kite at the sea's edge. This is only speculation, but there seemed to me an enormous significance of birth to the closing being a combination of: 1) New birth (Ann & Sax together with children), 2) Blue Mars realized, 3) The ...


4

I think it's safe to say Robinson intentionally left it unanswered, though he I believe he had a most likely outcome in mind and tipped it off. It is significant that Hiroko had reached mythic status, sometimes being seen in two places at once. I don't think the Asian woman referenced at the end could be Hiroko, because she would have been recognized. She ...


3

All the quotes below come from "Part 4, The Scientist as Hero" of Green Mars, but some are out of order. At this point in the trilogy Sax has known Phyllis for decades, the scene takes place in 2091 while the first 100 landing is 2026. Even when you dislike someone having a history that stretches back that (including the training period) seventy ...


2

I don't think they would work on Mars. First the timescale is hugely sped up. Mars society estimates a thousand years to get to a point where the air is thick enough for trees to grow and humans to be able to survive without pressure suits with an aqualung type closed system breathing apparatus. And it could be thousands, even hundred thousands of years, to ...


2

Same same but different There are major differences in the described terraforming approach for Mars in 2312, most notably the use of a soletta as the primary mechanism for high-speed terraforming - creating canals across the whole planet. As we know, this approach was tried in the Mars Trilogy but never ran for long as it was such an easy target for ...


1

They are not in the same timeline/universe. Kim Stanley Robinson has clarified this in an interview. BUT: After having read the first 200 pages of 2312 I dare say that while some details, ideas and developments differ from the Mars trilogy timeline a lot of stuff fits very well. My point being that you will recognise a lot of stuff, and a lot of the state ...


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