23

The Chronicles of Solace Series, by Roger MacBride Allen This is a series of three novels: The Depths of Time (2000) The Ocean of Years (2002) The Shores of Tomorrow (2003) Wormholes — separated by both space and time — provide the framework for the interstellar travel network. A carefully-regulated combination of instantaneous wormhole jumps, long ...


22

This is Jack Vance's novelette "The World Between" (1953), also known as "Ecological Onslaught". It has the two competing terraforming crews, from planets called Blue Star and Kay and the interaction of the competing processes results in a wild, but viable world very different (but more interesting) from any of the sterile designs originally intended by the ...


13

This sounds like the 'Rings of the Master' series by Jack L Chalker. 4 Books in the series, Lords of the Middle Dark, Pirates of the Thunder, Warriors of the Storm and Masques of the Martyrs. In these books a group of people are travelling between various colonies looking for a set of rings that can be used to take control of the Master System - a computer ...


10

The book you're looking for is Orphan Star by Alan Dean Foster. It's the third book in the Flinx and Pip series. From the Wiki: The novel takes place in 550 A.A. (After Amalgamation in Foster’s timeline, 2950 AD). Flinx, no longer a poor orphan, is chasing a merchant to Hivehom and Terra in search of information about his parentage. Along the way ...


9

Kenster and JayWasHere are correct. The film is "Mind Slaughter", part of the Kentucky Educational Television (KET) series "Universe and I". I remember seeing the short film long ago, and tracked down its identity via the worldcat.org link above. I contacted KET, and they made a copy for me from the archived Betacam tape. I just watched it to ensure it ...


9

Singularity 7 (2004) by Ben Templesmith? From Wikipedia: The comic tells the story of how Earth was forever changed after alien nanites arrived in a meteor shower. The nanites, able to shift the molecular structure of any material, bond with the mind of Bobby Hennigan who initially uses the nanites power to improve life on Earth by building complex machines ...


8

Walter Jon Willams, "Dinosaurs", 1987 Millions of years in the future, humanity has evolved and engineered itself along specialized branches. One such human, a diplomat named Drill, travels to an alien world to attempt to negotiate a peace treaty with the local civilization. Drill has a secondary brain that voices its physical urges to his primary brain. ...


8

If the planet to be rejuvenated is the Earth in the far future, you could be thinking of City at World's End, a 1950 novel by Edmund Hamilton which was also the answer to this old question. What language did you read it in? The ISFDB list of translations (possibly incomplete) includes German (1952), French (1952), Portuguese (1954), Japanese (1965), French (...


7

Sounds very much like Patrick Moore's 1950s juvenile The Voices of Mars. I no longer have a copy, but iirc the book ends with the hero collapsing from the effects of Earth gravity while addressing a conference and rebutting the evidence of the critics. He wakes in hospital to be told that his collapse swung the vote in their favour. I think one of the ...


6

I don't think the site selection criteria were described in the book, but the Martian trilogy is based on a lot of science and discussions with scientists working on Mars mission plans, so we can think about why would we choose this site to answer why the First Hundred went there. From the map at http://fwb.home.xs4all.nl/rgbmars.html, we can see that ...


6

This looks like it could be one of the books from the "Time For Dragons" Trilogy. NB I haven't read it personally. Information on these books on the internet is pretty scarce, but I found this review for the second book in the trilogy, "Dragons Past": This book takes place after the crew of main characters (humans) have destroyed the dragons in the ...


5

Isle of the Dead by Roger Zelazny. Here's the beginning of the novel: Life is a thing—if you’ll excuse a quick dab of philosophy before you know what kind of picture I’m painting—that reminds me quite a bit of the beaches around Tokyo Bay. Now, it’s been centuries since I’ve seen that Bay and those beaches, so I could be off a bit. But I’m told that it hasn’...


4

Thanks to everyone on this forum. I had been trying to find out the name of this short film for almost a decade. I saw it in 6th grade in 1988. I just got a copy from KET and posted it on Youtube:


4

I was searching for the same thing/same terms and Blueheart (1996) by Alison Sinclair was the right answer for me. There’s all the stuff about modified humans, terraforming and the conflict between those interests, but there’s also a murder mystery at the heart of the plot. There’s also this critical element that almost everywhere is under surveillance, ...


3

I can't say for sure, but I've read Blueheart (1996) by Alison Sinclair and your description reminds me of it. Here is the book's page on the author's website.


2

Another possibility is The Songs of Distant Earth (1986) by Arthur C. Clarke. From Wikipedia: The novel is set in the early 3800s CE, and takes place almost entirely on the faraway oceanic planet of Thalassa. Thalassa has a small human population sent there by way of an embryonic seed pod, one of many sent out from Earth in an attempt to continue ...


2

Check these out; A Door into Ocean, by Joan Slonczewski, 1986, and its sequel Daughter of Elysium, 1993. Both are about a pacifist but pragmatic purple-skinned female race of humanoids who can do bioengineering and live on a waterworld. In the first book they certainly resist impending terraforming. Maybe it's the one you're looking for.


2

I do agree to some extent that a larger sun with a higher metal index could have both a much wider habitable zone and a greater number of planet. If one could some how control gravity without too much effort the depth of atmosphere could be controlled. Some feel Sol could have a life supporting planet beyond Mars if the planet was larger and the right ...


2

I don't think they would work on Mars. First the timescale is hugely sped up. Mars society estimates a thousand years to get to a point where the air is thick enough for trees to grow and humans to be able to survive without pressure suits with an aqualung type closed system breathing apparatus. And it could be thousands, even hundred thousands of years, to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible