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45

Disclaimer: Ever since seeing the film I have been firmly on the interpretation that the writer's explanation is correct and I never believed the Russos' interpretation. As such my answer will be biased that way. I think this is mainly down to the fact that in universe they believe this to be the correct action to return the timelines back to normal ...


27

Even though he was living his life with Peggy in the alternate timeline, once he was done he could probably have used another mechanism entirely to return to his own. For instance, his alternate timeline presumably has a sorcerer supreme who possesses the time stone, so he could go and ask for a favor, or might have simply made it part of the arrangement ...


15

Captain America did not create new timeline branches when he time-traveled to 1970, 2014, 2015, and 2016 to return the Infinity Stones. He was instead revisiting the same timelines that had already been created by the Time Heist. We know it is possible to "dial up" and revisit a particular time branch once it has been created, because Thanos does this in ...


12

They said that going back into the past and removing the Infinity Stones would not change the effects they had on the present. They were saying that you can't change the past, it's already happened so what your trying to alter is actually your future. Therefore Steve never changed his past but his future i.e. it is his post Tony snap that is old not pre ...


12

I don't think the writers or directors have made definitive statements on exactly what creates an alternate reality. From the movie itself — specifically, Banner's conversation with the Ancient One, and her handy timeline diagram — we know that the Infinity Stones have to be returned, because leaving a branched timeline without an Infinity Stone would be ...


11

There might be previous examples, depending on definition In Doctor Strange, Strange has a time loop that resets the entirety of the Dark Dimension. Effectively, this sends him back in time, but since it doesn't only affect him and resets his physical state as opposed to leaving it unchanged, it's not conventional. Similarly, being able to see the future, ...


10

To answer this I'd like to refer to one of my favourite things on the Internet, A Guide to SF Chronophysics. In the Type Summaries section, it describes four general models of time travel: Deterministic/Permanent Elastic/Resilient Overwriting/Contingent Quantum-forking/Multi-divergent Avengers: Endgame follows Here's some of the movies mentioned by ...


9

William Tenn, Brooklyn Project. Also an accepted answer to this old question: Short story ID: Bouncing-Ball Time Travel The answer to the older question is extremely well done, please see it for details.


9

We don't know, in fact it might not even be different. All we know is that The Ancient One tells us that the Infinity Stones control the flow of time and removing one spawns an alternate reality. This leads us to three possible theories of what can happen post Avengers: Endgame: Time is unregulated: Time is now unregulated and so any number of alternate ...


8

Hank Pym. In Ant Man (2015), Hank stated: Hank Pym: I spent thirty years protecting that technology from a Stark, I sure as hell don't intend to give it to another! This isn't cute technology like the Iron Man suit! This could change the techs of reality! Besides, they must already have their hands busy throwing cities out of the sky... Time travel ...


6

This article details a Q&A event in China with the Russo brothers. Here's the relevant material. Quoted text is from the Russo brothers. Unquoted italicized text is by the author of gthe article: So does that mean there are two Captain America’s in that alternate timeline? “Yes, there were two Captain Americas in that reality. It’s just ...


6

I should have known I'd find this with a little more poking into my recent book history. It's The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. by Neal Stephenson. D.O.D.O. build a gigantic Faraday cage to exclude the collapsing-wave-form pollution of modern life, put a real-life witch inside it and get her to send their agents back in time. To begin with, these temporal ...


5

Time travel, as presented in Endgame, doesn’t solve all problems. Merely travelling back in time does not, as demonstrated in the movie, change the present. So, unless there’s something you want to borrow from the past to help the future, and you’re prepared to create a new alternate reality while doing so, it’s not a helpful idea. It only solved one ...


5

In the Terminator franchise, creating a paradox isn't a problem; you have simply changed history, and the future you remember won't happen. The movies don't all take place in the same history. The SkyNet from T1, T3 and T5 all have different (but related) origins. The Connors and SkyNet are playing a sort of cosmic chess, where every move changes history. ...


5

Time travel isn't real. The writers can make up whatever rules they want regarding it. If they don't want a paradox to be an issue, it won't be. It doesn't help that the franchise has had different views on how time travel/timelines work as it went along. The first movie was written as a pure casual time loop, Terminator 2 tried suggest Judgement Day ...


4

The Ancient One phrased it this way: The Infinity Stones create what you experience as the flow of time. Remove one of the stones, and that flow splits. Now this may benefit your reality. But my new one, not so much. In this new branched reality, without our chief weapon against the forces of darkness, our world will be overrun. Note, it's not just the ...


4

In Stephen Baxter's novel The Time Ships (1995), traveling into the past creates a new timeline, but the old one continues to exist. The time-traveling scientist in that book doesn't know how to return to his original timeline using his technology; whenever he goes forward in time, he remains in the new timeline created, and experiences the changed ...


4

It seems to be that yes, they broke the rules. However I will provide a backdoor for hand-waving. See also: Why didn't this character die even though they shot this person in Avengers: Endgame? I posted the following to "Is there a grandfather paradox in Endgame?" As Banner explains, they cannot change their past: If you travel to the past, that past ...


4

My reading of the movie is that the flow of time is not different at all. The reason for it is something like: The above forms a stable timeloop, meaning that everything that happens in the previous MCU movies really did happen. There is a single timeline that includes all of the previous events and at a few points The biggest take away from all of this ...


4

I think you misunderstood the ending: if it was the way you tell it, yes, it breaks its own time travel rules. What I understood is that Captain America lived his life in the "other" past (other timeline) and then came back when he was old: I remember Bruce Banner saying something about Cap' having used its device to come back. That way, it doesn't break ...


3

The Star Trek: The Animated Series episode Yesteryear (1973) features Spock traveling back in time and saving his child self from death by posing as his "cousin" Selek.


3

Continuum was a canadian time travel show on the SyFy channel that dealt with alternate timelines in much the same way as Avengers Endgame. "The series centers on the conflict between a police officer and a group of rebels from the year 2077 who time-travel to Vancouver, BC in the year 2012." Continuum wiki Alternate futures "It appears that each new ...


1

Check out the list at https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TemporalMutability under the Branching Timelines heading. The list is pretty short, though to be fair it seems incomplete. So Avengers: Endgame isn’t the first, its just that there’s a lot of examples of time travel that don’t use the Branching Timelines approach, especially when it comes to ...


1

No, Banner says you can't change your own past. Not that you can't change the past. In Roger's case, his life followed a linear passage of time with no conflict. It just so happens that part of that path of that time overlapped from 1945 to 2019. Rogers doesn't change his past life. There is no reason to believe that the older Rogers, from the future, ...


1

My opinion is that he did it for selfish reasons. He knew that if she ever became rich and famous, he would get his own cut of her money. But if she fell in love and let that take precedence over her career, he wouldn't be so lucky. So he wanted to thwart any budding romance she had, but he also knew that she had talked to psychics who told her that she ...


1

"By His Bootstraps" is a semi-match to that question description, but another story matches other parts of the question more closely. The Bootstrap protagonist does see himself from the future, then visits himself in the past, to become triumphant and live a good life in his world. So, not really stuck in a time loop forever. Robert Silverberg's ...


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