28

That is almost certainly Andre Norton's Galactic Derelict which matches your description point for point. Here is probably the cover you remember: Here's an image search with a whole set of covers. And here's the Wikipedia page on the book.


9

I think you're looking for Michael Crichton's Timeline In Corazon, Dan Baker and his wife are lost and driving through the Northern Arizona desert when they come across a man in his seventies with very little hair on his head but a sizeable beard. He looks like a priest. They pull over to help him, then take him to a hospital in Gallup, New Mexico. They ...


5

Something in your description is reminiscent of a story by Gregory Kern (a pseudonym of E.C. Tubb), titled Galaxy of the Lost, published in 1973: this short novel includes an automated spaceport of a dead race that has been abandoned but no time travel that I remember, just (perhaps) another dimension. The cover of a later edition also might fit your ...


5

Like Eike Pierstorff says in a comment, this matches the seventh voyage from The Star Diaries (Dzienniki gwiazdowe) by Stanisław Lem. In that story, Ijon Tichy is stranded with his spaceship in a time vortex, and ends up together with several copies of himself. The story is humorous, Ijon both gets in fights with his past and future self and has to ...


5

As mentioned in the comments, this certainly sounds like Slipstream (2005). From Wikipedia: Stuart Conway (Sean Astin) has developed a hand-held, cellphone-like time travel device called 'Slipstream' that allows the user to travel back in time 10 minutes by interfacing with a cellphone system regional antenna. At first, he uses the device primarily to ...


2

The rules you have described do appear to lead to paradoxes. If you travel into your past, there are two obvious problems. One is that, presumably, you can do things differently this time around, and that means changing the past—which requires a parallel worlds interpretation in order to make sense. Secondly, if the watch moves from where it was in the ...


1

As Jeeped said in the comments, this doesn't actually sound like a fourth distinct kind of time travel: it sounds like a variant of the second kind that you list. Based on your description, "going back in time" in 24 could be explained as entering a new timeline at a point that looks like a past point in your own timeline. Nothing in the new timeline is ...


1

I don't know whether there's any explicit discussion of this; it seems unlikely in the TV shows because it wouldn't exactly make thrilling viewing, but I suppose there might be something in one or more of the many books or other non-canon material. However, we do know from canon that warp engines have a maximum speed, not a maximum acceleration. That ...


1

"A Kid in King Arthur's Court" (1995) This could be the 1995 movie "A Kid in King Arthur's Court" which is a kid's movie take on the Connecticut Yankee Mark Twain book. It stars Thomas Ian Nicholas, a.k.a. 'The kid from Rookie of the Year' as a little league baseball player who is teleported back to the medieval days of Arthur. Ron Moody plays Merlin and ...


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