28

If you follow the source linked in the Wikipedia article it quotes LeGuin with saying in an open letter that she had "simply forgot" that she had used the name already. Also the planets are described differently. Screenshot from Google Books: The book is: Erlich, Richard D. (2009). Coyote's Song: The Teaching Stories of Ursula K. Le Guin. Milford series: ...


16

From the Guardian: Q: The austere, anti-materialistic, pioneering spirit of the anarchist settlers on Anarres, in The Dispossessed, reminds me a bit of accounts of the very early kibbutzim, set up by idealistic European socialists and anarchists. Did you have this, or any other experimental communities, in mind when you wrote the novel? UKL: I did ...


15

This is a world in which drug use is ubiquitous. The irony being that while the counsellor says that his goal is to help Orr off of drugs, literally his first action is to offer him more drugs "O. K., fine, nothing out of the way there. If you'd been stockpiling your pills, to sell to addicts or commit a murder with, then you'd be in hot water. But as ...


14

Ursula Le Guin has stated that she coined the term because "it sounded like answerable." She's only addressed that once on record, though - in 2001, Usenet user Dave Goldman posted the following to rec.arts.sf.written (as archived on Google Groups): I've just started a writing workshop from Ms. Le Guin, so I asked her... Turns out that she derived "...


13

It sounds like you’re looking for Direction of the Road. I haven’t read it myself (yet), but I found a synopsis on Ekostories that sounds similar to the book you’re talking about: Direction of the Road is a scant seven pages, told from the perspective of a large oak situated by the side of a road. Inspired by a real tree living beside Highway 18 near ...


11

According to Le Guin, she did consider the Kibbutzim (and Chinese Commune) movement in relation to the relative gender differences that might be found in utopian society, but cites her main influence overall as being "Engels, Marx, Godwin, Goldman, [Paul] Goodman, and above all Shelley and Kropotkin" which she describes as 'the Utopias' and 'the Anarchists'. ...


11

It is likely "Intracom" as per the summary found here: An absurdist script about a starship on a journey. Nobody's quite sure where or why. The crew are all mad, and they become foster parents of an alien...but from where? Another datapoint, this paper on themes of feminism is Le Guin's work: To illustrate the changes in Le Guin's opinions and ...


9

The Nameless Ones were dark powers of the Earth. The religion built up around worshiping them was largely irrelevant to them; they did not care about their holy places being defiled by people entering where they were not "supposed" to be. They did, however, care about Ged's attempt to remove an item of great magical power from their possession. From the ...


7

This is specifically address in the book. Le Guin explictly states that rape (or forced seduction) are simply impossible. Consider: There is no unconsenting sex, no rape. As with most mammals other than man, coitus can be performed only by mutual invitation and consent; otherwise it is not possible. Seduction certainly is possible, but it must have ...


6

It's mentioned in the book's inscription Farther west than west beyond the land my people are dancing on the other wind. -- The Song of the Woman of Kemay It seems to refer to the process of traveling to an astral plane rather than the mundane death of a character. Note that we see certain individuals come back when sufficient magic is used: "...


6

The Nameless Ones were only half-aware that Ged had entered the labyrinth, and probably didn't notice Kossil and Manan's transgressions at all. 'Because every instant since I set foot in cavern under the Tombstones, I have striven to keep them still, to keep them unaware. All my skills have gone to that, I have spent my strength on it. I have filled ...


6

I have two ways to answer this: First in universe - Genly Ai is trying to understand the society of Gethen, and some concepts are alien to him. He connects this to the Earth concepts of "Face" and "Honor". A similar thing happens when translating the German work "Gemütlichkeit" into English. No single word works well, we need a collection of words to get ...


5

I think this might be Some Approaches to the Problem of the Shortage of Time. It's in her anthology The Compass Rose. [Incidentally, both of the stories quoted below were written as humorous pieces and never intended to be confused with actual science.] THE LITTLE TINY HOLE THEORY The hypothesis put forward by James Osbold of the Lick Observatory, ...


5

It could be the first three books of Le Guin's Hainish cycle. Although the stories are separate, they all concern the League of All Worlds, of which Earth (known as Terra) is a member. In Rocannon's World, the planets of the League are preparing for a war with invaders making their way across the galaxy toward Earth. In Planet of Exile, the main ...


5

If it is Le Guin, it might be Four Ways to Forgiveness, which is four linked stories in a single volume. It's part of the Hainish Cycle, but pretty much stands alone. There are three planets (Hain, and two in a single solar system), and one of the stories does concern the Hainish ambassador who has a long voyage to arrive.


4

The simple answer: One of the premises of the novel is that there are no gender-specific differences in size and strength, even in kemmer. Therefore kemmer-female on somer or kemmer-male rape is physically more feasible among the hermaphroditic Gethenian-humans than among us non-hermaphroditic (dioecious?) humans. A fuller answer: It's important to ...


4

As far as I can tell, the only part of the book that fits the image shown is Ged's confrontation with Yevaud. Massive dragon - Check Wizard holding staff - Check Obviously Ged is in a boat in the actual passage (and presumably wouldn't stand with his back to the fire-breathing dragon), but this is easily dismissed as simply being a result of deliberate ...


3

The story contains 16,566 words. This puts it into the novelette category, albeit at the top end. Best Novelette: Awarded for a science fiction or fantasy story of between seven thousand five hundred (7,500) and seventeen thousand five hundred (17,500) words. Hugo Award Categories - The Official Rules


3

Approximately? Somewhere around 12k, which is enough less than 17.5k that an error of 25% still won't make it a novella. I'm basing the estimate on its appearance in the collection The Birthday of the World where it occupies 46 pages. (I selected that particular entry from the list of all publications because a paperback has the most consistent size, as ...


1

Since Ged had entered the Tombs, he had used his Mage skills to weave 'a vast network' of spells of concealment and sleep on the Nameless Ones- the powers of the Earth of that particular spot- for his own purposes. It was for that reason that Kossil's transgression of lighting the undertomb went unpunished, as well as Manans. Well- not entirely unpunished. ...


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