38

Are you paraphrasing, or do you remember any sources that specifically refer to "constellations"? Doing a text search (control-F, or command-F if you're using a Mac) of "The Call of Cthulhu" online shows no instances of the word "constellation", but there are several parts that predicted Cthulhu would come back "when the stars were right". Here's the section ...


33

Yes, it was based on the Stephen Harris House, 135 Benefit Street, Providence. Here's a picture by Flickr user Andrew Kuchling: And here's Lovecraft on his letter to Lillian Clark, 4 November 1924 (from Letters from New York 82): And on the corner of Bridge St. & Elizabeth Ave. is a terrible old house—a hellish place where night-black deeds must ...


29

The word "cultist" wasn't common at the time. Lovecraft's productive period was 1908~1936. In the Google book corpus, the word “cultist” only pops up around the 1920s, and then again only gets popular considerably later; see here. It must have felt like a neologism back then, and we all know how Lovecraft was fond of archaisms rather than novelties. ...


25

Alrighty, in the absence of more informed answers: I think you’re right that Lovecraft only described Cthulhu in The Call of Cthulhu. The description there reads: A monster of vaguely anthropoid outline, but with an octopus-like head whose face was a mass of feelers, a scaly, rubbery-looking body, prodigious claws on hind and fore feet, and long, narrow ...


24

It sounds like you may be crossing two stories. HP Lovecraft's 'From Beyond' involves a scientist creating a device that stimulate dormant senses in the human mind, allowing them to see thing from beyond this plane of existence. Once able to be seen, they, too, can see those who see them, and things go downhill from there. The creatures are very amorphous,...


24

That depends largely on which stories you're talking about. The Elder Things, like most of the other extra-terrestrial creatures in Lovecraft's original stories, can't really be described as "good" or "evil" in the traditional sense. They were alien, so ascribing human motivations to them is somewhat pointless. For the most part, they simply existed on ...


24

In-universe Gotham City isn't in the same universe as Lovecraft's writings, but Lovecraftian monsters appeared in Batman: The Doom that Came to Gotham in the year 2000. It is an Elseworlds story which isn't part of the main canon. Arkham Asylum was named for its founder, Dr. Amadeus Arkham. He first appeared in Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious ...


22

The real answer: Lovecraft did not coin the phrase Tekeli-li!; Poe did, and he gave no specific pronunciation guide. From At the Mountains of Madness: Of course common reading is what prepared us both to make the interpretation, though Danforth has hinted at queer notions about unsuspected and forbidden sources to which Poe may have had access ...


21

In a 2010 interview with Marc Laidlaw (a science-fiction writer who worked on Half-Life, its expansions, and Half-Life 2), he agreed that Lovecraft had some influence on the Half-Life series, especially with regards to Lovecraft's philosophy of cosmicism- that is, that mankind is simply a tiny, insignificant blip when compared to the dark mysteries of the ...


19

Lovecraft said the following about his storytelling style in a letter to fellow writer Clark Ashton Smith: My own rule is that no weird story can truly produce terror unless it is devised with all the care & verisimilitude of an actual hoax. The author must forget all about "short story technique", & build up a stark, simple account, full of ...


18

Cthulhu as drawn by H. P. Lovecraft and a sculpture based on drawing from Lovecraft. the Elder sign shown below (the "leaf" one, not the "eye" one) was drawn by Lovecraft in a 1930 letter to Clark Ashton Smith.


18

From the Wikipedia article on R'lyeh: Lovecraft claims R'lyeh is located at 47°9′S 126°43′W. [H.P Lovecraft, "The Call of Cthulhu" (1928)] Writer August Derleth, a contemporary correspondent of Lovecraft and co-creator of the Cthulhu Mythos, placed R'lyeh at 49°51′S 128°34′W. [Derleth, A. The Black Island (1952)] The latter coordinates place ...


18

I'm going to post the results of my own reading and research here, although honestly I was hoping someone already had a list from Lovecraft scholarship that they could share! This list is subject to revision, expansion, deletion, and rearrangement as I find out more. Authors whose works Lovecraft drew elements from Robert W. Chambers The King in Yellow (...


17

Zadock Allen's story in The Shadow Over Innsmouth is the best example in HP's works of people (a whole town) turning to the worship of the Old Ones. As with any IRL cult, it's a combination of accident, active recruiting and a "calling". Even before meeting the islanders that gave him the instructions to contact the Old Ones, Obed Marsh was inclined to look ...


16

Yes, he used the exact phrase "cosmic horror." But not to describe the beings of which he wrote! So far as I can make out, when he mentions cosmic horror --whether in his stories or his essays-- it is the ideas, not the monsters, to which he refers. In his essay Supernatural Horror in Literature, Lovecraft describes his philosophy of cosmic indifference: ...


15

Piggybacking off the quote provided in Hypnosifl's answer, it is likely that it is related to our solar system orbiting around the galaxy, which takes 225-250 million years. This is the only explanation that plausibly allows "uncounted millions of years rolled by." to make sense, but also allows a repeated and predictable "star's aligning". http://earthsky....


14

Well, as Lovecraft liked to do, it's not laid out explicitly, but, here's how Wikipedia describes it: As the two progress further into the city, they are ultimately drawn to a massive, ominous entrance which is the opening of a tunnel which they believe leads into the subterranean region described in the murals. Compulsively they are drawn in, finding ...


13

The King in Yellow, by Robert W Chambers, is one known influence to Lovecraft. HP Lovecraft himself included references to "the King in Yellow" in some of his works, although mainly as a written play that people found and sometimes read. One of many occult texts Lovecraft referred to, such as the Necronomicon. Lovecraft also associated Hastur with the ...


12

A lot of this is answered by Wikipedia. For instance (according to his autobiography Danse Macabre), Lovecraftian themes (such as the Necronomicon or characters such as Yog-Sothoth) occur by name in King books such as Gramma, ‘Salem’s Lot, I Know What You Need. Furthermore, It is quite obviously influenced by Lovecraft. Cthulhu mythos in popular culture ...


12

At the Mountains of Madness is every bit as much sci-fi as Ridley Scott's Alien is. Both stories involve travel to a remote location by means of the most advanced technology of the day. Both make some attempt at quantifying a terrible horror. Both ultimately dive deep into the horror genre. Do they cross genres? Yes. Do they exhibit clear properties of ...


12

I am one of the developers and saw your post recently. We used many references from H.P. Lovecraft's works but there is no, one specific book we aimed to predominate the story.


12

They come, independently, from two different cultures but have a the same root. That root is helplessness. The commonality is that there are things that are bigger than you are and that you are insignificant in their eyes. Giant monsters have been a staple of most cultures: dragons (western and eastern), giants, hydra, giant dogs/wolves, etc. They often ...


12

The protagonist of Lovecraft's short story The Horror at Red Hook is Thomas Malone, a detective with the NYPD.


11

Lovecraft gives us the precise location: Then, driven ahead by curiosity in their captured yacht under Johansen's command, the men sight a great stone pillar sticking out of the sea, and in S. Latitude 47°9', W. Longitude l23°43', come upon a coastline of mingled mud, ooze, and weedy Cyclopean masonry which can be nothing less than the tangible substance ...


11

Let me shed a little light on this discussion thread. Technically, Lovecraft only wrote one novel: The Case of Charles Dexter Ward. At The Mountains of Madness, The Shadow Over Innsmouth, A Shadow Out of Time, etc., all of them are technically novellas. If you want to thoroughly enjoy Lovecraft's writing, in my opinion, you should purchase two books: ...


11

Technically he could be called one Defining Lich as: In fantasy fiction, a lich (/ˈlɪtʃ/;1 sometimes spelled liche, cognate to Dutch lijk and German Leiche, both meaning "corpse") is a type of undead creature. Often such a creature is the result of a transformation, as a powerful magician or king striving for eternal life uses spells or rituals to bind ...


11

It seems to be a mixture of black magic and body transference From The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, we see Joeseph Curwen was almost certainly a necromancer: In many cases, diarists have recorded with some awe, Curwen shewed almost the power of a wizard in unearthing family secrets for questionable use. During the final five years of his life it seemed ...


11

No Lovecraft never really created a strict pantheon of gods, so there was never any mention of "X being enemy/brother of Y" - for HPL his monsters were just background for the story itself: According to David E. Schultz, Lovecraft never meant to create a canonical Mythos but rather intended his imaginary pantheon to serve merely as a background element. ...


11

Not all Great Old Ones induce madness. Looking upon Cthulu will drive all humans insane, but viewing Yig, the "Father of Serpents", does not. Yig is described as "shapen like a man, except ye look at him clost." This description strongly indicates that he can be looked at without going insane. Yig's description is in "The Curse of Yig" (collaboration ...


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