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69

In Tolkien's little conceit, the characters themselves aren't speaking English, but rather speaking Westron, a language he invented that's derived from Old English, and it is only he, the narrator, that presents the words as English words, such as "Witch-King". Here's an explanation from the Wikipedia entry on Westron: For example, Meriadoc Brandybuck's ...


42

The primary reason writers still use the witch's hat in their literature is because the pointy hat is a form of writer's shorthand, a means to indicate to the reader we are seeing a witch, a being of power, of dark pacts, potentially dangerous, to be respected and feared. Yes, it is the very definition of stereotyping, but it works. This image of the witch ...


19

Probably the work you are looking for is the Malleus Maleficarum, written in 1486. This work was used as the definitive work on how to detect and deal with witches. Previously, the position was that witches did not exist, and it was heresy to believe in them; but by the time of this work the contra-viewpoint - that witches did exist and it was heresy not to ...


18

The Weird Sisters came directly from Shakespeare's source material for the play, Raphael Holinshed's Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland. It fortuned as Makbeth and Banquho iournied towards Fores, where the king then laie, they went sporting by the waie togither without other companie, saue onelie themselues, passing thorough the woods and ...


18

There appears to be no difference between wizard and sorcerer, save that one tends to be used in a more formal and historical context. They shared a wish, a hope, a dream, They hatched a daring plan To educate young sorcerers Thus Hogwarts School began. HP and the Goblet of Fire It's also used (by the author) when it works as a form of ...


16

Faramir describes "the black arts" This is Faramir speaking to Frodo, and it's from the chapter labeled "The Window in the West" in The Two Towers The Men of Numenor were settled far and wide on the shores and seaward regions of the Great Lands, but for the most part they fell into evils and follies. Many became enamoured of the Darkness and the ...


15

I think you have this a little wrong. They don't say that actual witches died - indeed, the subject of Harry's essay suggests quite the opposite: Harry moved the tip of his eagle-feather quill down the page, frowning as he looked for something that would help him write his essay, 'Witch-Burning in the Fourteenth Century Was Completely Pointless - discuss.'...


12

Obviously, based on you even asking the question, it must be true that not all witchcraft in Supernatural requires demonic worship. In fact, magic itself in the series is just one more mystical tool available for those that know how to use it. Much like the various weapons can be wielded by anyone, even if they are not its intended wielder (e.g. anyone ...


11

This is probably "The Satanic Son of Superman", printed in Action Comics #410 in 1972. The portion you're remembering is actually a very small segment of the issue, serving as a backstory for the issue's villain (Superman's son's evil twin, and no I'm not making that up). Superman falls in love and gets married Relevant transcript: But as you suspend ...


9

Isobel Ross, wife of Robert McGonagall, lived as a Muggle. Isobel Ross fell in love with and married a Muggle minister. She became a housewife, and lived with him, having given up the magical world. Isobel and Robert moved into a manse (minister’s house) on the outskirts of Caithness, where the beautiful Isobel proved surprisingly adept at making the ...


8

TL;DR: There is no canon evidence that states that because wizards and witches have longer lifespans that they necessarily look younger at a given age than their Muggle counterparts would. Wizards seem to age at about the same rate as Muggles; they just live longer. I agree with DVK, who said it first, that this seems to be an inapplicable problem in the ...


8

I don't have a direct source for most of this, so it could be made up, but I had a friend who used to live in this area who was a Pagan. I don't mean a neo-Pagan or a 20th (or 21st) century Wiccan. I mean he was really into the old ways and studied up on them. I asked him about this and he said that it was originally ceremonial. There was a ceremony ...


8

Omega by Stewart Farrar. Stewart Farrar was a practicing witch. Omega is about scientists discovering the Mendoza effect; deriving energy by giant poles stuck into the earth. However, the project releases madness inducing dust, which the British government decides to blame on the witches. Who are then hunted by the government-sponsored motorcycle gangs.


7

The first known account, according to Wikipedia, was a claim in 1453 from a male witch Guillaume Edeli. This is a historical account, which of course can't be verified, but the person claimed to have done it. It was later used in fiction relating to witches/wizards. It has been around in movies for some time, and has seemed to be common lore, even before JK ...


7

The primary difference between the Winchesters and Witches is about their choices made when using magic and against whom the magic is targeted. In the strictest sense, the magic the Winchesters use is a form of ritualistic magic, able to be done by anyone with the correct incantations, material elements and making the correct sacrifices. What separates them ...


7

The story is "Maid to Measure" by Damon Knight, first published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction Vol. 27 No. 4 October 1964, and reprinted in 1966 Knight's collection Turning On as well as in the 1978 100 Great Science Fiction Short Short Stories, edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin Harry Greenberg, and Joseph D Olander.


7

The show was First Wave. Former thief turned security specialist Kincaid Lawrence "Cade" Foster’s life was idyllic, with a beautiful wife, good job and a nice house. Unbeknownst to him, a race of extraterrestrials called the Gua have identified him as subject 117 in an experiment to test human resilience. As part of this experiment, his life is ...


7

Once a Witch by Carolyn MacCullough (2009). Tamsin Greene comes from a long line of witches, and on the day she was born, her grandmother proclaimed she would be one of the most Talented among them. But Tamsin's magic never showed up. ... a childhood friend, Gabriel, comes back to live with her family and his Talent is finding lost objects. ... ...


7

I think you might be thinking of Season 2 Episode 2, "Morality Bites" of the Charmed TV series, which aired October 7, 1999. When Phoebe has a premonition of herself being burned to death, the sisters travel ten years into the future to learn what will happen. They discover that she used her powers to kill Cal Greene, causing a local D.A. named Nathaniel ...


6

"The Witches of Worm" by Zilpha Keatley Snyder (1972). Jessica, a troubled young girl who lives with a neglectful mother, finds a stray kitten and hand raises. She comes to believe the black cat is a witch's cat, and she's being possessed and forced to do evil deeds by a coven of witches working through the cat. I do remember the scene with the trumpet (I ...


5

This is Anthony Horowitz's Groosham Grange (already confirmed by the OP in comments). Here's a summary I found in a review: David had been kicked out of a few schools and when he came home and told his parents that he was getting kicked out of his current school, Beton Academy, they were very angry. Suddenly, a letter appears telling them that David had ...


5

I don't think it's a reference to anything in particular, just a parody of American war movies in general. Note that the Annotated Pratchett File entry for Wyrd Sisters doesn't have anything for this passage specifically.


5

Could it be "The Destroying Angel" by Bernard King? The book seems to tickle a fair few of the points you've mentioned: Male author 1980s publishing date Adult theming (grisly murders, etc) Male protagonist Part of a Trilogy of books Heavy mushroom theme (title is obviously a species of mushroom) Pyewacket is named as a character Mention of various ...


5

There is at least two documented cases of a wizard killed by muggles in medieval times. From https://www.pottermore.com/features/the-best-loved-hogwarts-ghosts: Nearly Headless Nick or Sir Nicholas de Mimsy-Porpington: How he died: Execution, after an attempt to beautify a lady-in-waiting at the court of King Henry VII caused her to sprout tusks. ...


5

Thanks to Joe L. I found the name of the book. It's Witchlight by Marion Zimmer Bradley.


5

After a long search, I think I found it: Lizzie Dripping by Helen Cresswell. No-one in the village believes that Lizzie's seen a witch! But Lizzie doesn't care because she knows that in all Little Hemlock there's no one half as interesting as this witch - and besides it makes life far more exciting to have such an unusual friend. Blue cover, the original ...


4

That's The Enchantment Emporium by Tanya Huff. It's set in Calgary. There's also a sequel, The Wild Ways, focusing on Charlie (a cousin of Allie, who's the main character of the first book). It's set primarily in Cape Breton.


4

At least according to the wiki entry for the Morai (Emphasis mine): In Shakespeare's Macbeth the Weird sisters (or Three Witches), are prophetesses, who are deeply entrenched in both worlds of reality and supernatural. Their creation was influenced by British folklore, witchcraft, and the legends of the Norns and the Moirai.[76] Hecate, the chthonic Greek ...


4

There's someone who lived as a Muggle for only a limited time. We know very little about this, but I believe it was done as a marketing gimmick to sell a book about his struggles, similar to historical reality television shows, in which contemporary people live without modern technology for some time. The information is on J. K. Rowling's old website, in ...


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