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6

It would not have been conquest. In the first appearance of the Borg, Q is very clear that this is not their goal. Q: The Borg is the ultimate user. They're unlike any threat your Federation has ever faced. They're not interested in political conquest, wealth or power as you know it. They're simply interested in your ship, its technology. They've ...


7

From what we know of the Borg within the context of "Q Who", their intention was most likely to capture the Enterprise and dismantle it to absorb the ship's technology while killing the crew. As the Borg and the collective were further developed in subsequent stories, Borg seem to prioritise the assimilation of biological entities as much as technology. So, ...


-4

Given the inspiration for the Borg, it's more likely a language inspired by the the non-Anglo Germanic languages, like Spaniard - meaning Visigothic - (including their offshoots in the Americas - Puerto Rican, El Salvadorian, Cubans, etc) Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Hebrew, or Russian, but it's never shown. However Hugh speaks English, but that's possibly ...


25

The concept of assimilation was introduced in Best of Both Worlds, but later works develop the concept and even retcon it as the modus operandi of the Borg. The Voyager episode Raven, in particular, shows how 7 of 9 was assimilated years before the events of Q Who. As for Guinan not mentioning it - we see multiple times where assimilation is treated as ...


3

SHORT ANSWER: Nobody knows. LONG ANSWER: The evidence is inconclusive. In "Q Who" there was no evidence that the Borg assimilated any biological beings into their collective. So presumably the Borg would probably have killed any Enterprise crew or passengers that survived the decompression when a section of the Enterprise was sliced off and seized by ...


26

It was revealed in the EU novel Greater than the Sum that the eighteen crew members were in fact assimilated by the Borg, rather than killed by exposure to space (or sliced in half by the Borg cutting beam), as the episode would seem to suggest. “I’m sorry, have we met before?”   “Of course, you wouldn’t recognize me, not like this…” She came to ...


4

Memory Alpha says they were "vaporized" in the episode summary. The "Apocrypha" section, however, says that in one of the novels, the eighteen Enterprise crew members were indeed assimilated instead of outright killed as the episode portrayed.


0

"Descent" makes it very clear that they are just renegade Borg. Not the Collective itself. The Collective were still scary as Hell. Part of what this episode so creepy is that the crew don't know what they're dealing with this time. Borg who murder and wanna destroy inferior lifeforms? It's what makes part 1 so creepy. So when people criticize the episode ...


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