75

Star Trek, Various, 1966 (earliest occurrence) P=NP in the Star Trek universe, but the people there aren't aware of it. Evidence: There is encryption but it is always breakable. P=NP will let you crack everything but one-time pads but the Federation stubbornly continues to use NP-based ciphers. The efficacy of the universal translator. P=NP would make ...


53

In the Last Jedi, The odds of such a plan succeeding is logically very low, since security is a vital part of any military operation. It must have been statistically inconceivable that people could just fly over and sneak into a warship without detection. Likewise, the chances that some unauthorised person could successfully break into a specially secured ...


37

Short answer: plenty of them. They did not live to tell the story. Or they were smart enough not to try, considering the odds. The most obvious one is when Tarkin disregarded an officer's warning that the rebels have a good chance to destroy the station. A New Hope "Evacuate? In our moment of triumph? I think you over-estimate their chances!" ―...


26

I think it's one of the books in Sharon Lee & Steve Miller's Liaden Universe — Scout's Progress. From the blurb: All of her life, Aelliana Caylon has lived by the rules of her overbearing brother, the head of the Caylon family. Though she is a brilliant mathematician, he has convinced her that she has no worth beyond what value she might have in ...


25

The other Stross book that deals with this is The Atrocity Archives, where Alan Turing solved P=NP, but they then found that doing so allowed access to the Cthonic Realms, so now an entire branch of Government exists to prevent this discovery becoming public knowledge.


20

Look like The Feeling of Power from Isaac Asimov. I read it in the Nine Tomorrows short stories collection. In the distant future, humans live in a computer-aided society and have forgotten the fundamentals of mathematics, including even the rudimentary skill of counting. The Terrestrial Federation is at war with Deneb, and the war is conducted by ...


13

Ah-ha! The story you're looking for is Theodore Sturgeon's "What Dead Men Tell". It's collected in The Perfect Host, and at least some pages of it are available on google books The protaganist wakes up in a triangular corridor; as he explores, he discovers a body that has been laid out in his path, and notices that the colours of the walls and his ...


12

Dr. Murry is being laughed at because, by any reckoning, he is talking nonsense Dr. Murry is presenting to a group of scientists, many of whom are likely physicists, and he is essentially claiming that you can ignore all the known rules of physics by thinking about it the right way. There is more to the presentation in the movie than shown in that clip. ...


11

I don't think it exists in the form you describe - mathematics that is new in the academic sense is invariably extremely abstract and complex, which is almost impossible to write stories about, except in the style of A Beautiful Mind, i.e. human drama that involves mathematicians, but glosses over the actual math. The only kind of “mathematics fiction” I've ...


11

Noble-born girls were educated in mathematics, but apparently only to the proficiency required for running the accounts of a household. See the following quote (emphasis mine): It hurt that the one thing Arya could do better than her sister was ride a horse. Well, that and manage a household. Sansa had never had much of a head for figures. If she did ...


11

Perhaps George Gamow's Mr. Tompkins books: Mr Tompkins is the titular character in a series of four non-fiction books by the physicist George Gamow. The books are structured as a series of dreams in which Mr Tompkins enters alternate worlds where the physical constants have radically different values from those they have in the real world. Gamow aims to ...


11

However ... So ... You ask: This universe ... More details at http://www.gregegan.net/ORTHOGONAL/06/GRExtra.html


9

For non-mathematicians the way to understand the shape of a wormhole is to start in two dimensions where we can represent space by a flat sheet. A wormhole is where two parallel sheets are joined together. This diagram (attempts!) to show how the wormhole joins the two sheets: Start with the two sheets representing the two different regions of spacetime, ...


9

Probably "Gomez", a 1954 novelette by C. M. Kornbluth, available at Project Gutenberg Canada. The image below is from New Worlds Science Fiction #32, February 1955 (available at the Internet Archive): Description by contributor Rowen Bell at Alex Kasman's Mathematical Fiction site: this story is about a physics prodigy, but a mathematical equation ...


8

It could be Light by M. John Harrison. It came out in 2002, but that's not too far from the 90s, and although Harrison has been writing SF since the '60s or '70s, I think his best known work is the Viriconium sequence which is a fantasy (although technically it's SF). Light has three separate subplots, one of which involves a couple of scientists. One of ...


8

After a lot of fiddly Googling, the title "Flan" is correct, by Mary Caraker; it appeared in Jack and Jill magazine, vol. 42, issue 4 (April, 1980). The only two mentions I found online were in two student Prezi files dated about the same time (March 2014), so I guess there's a teacher somewhere who has a copy of this magazine and uses it in class. Extra ...


8

It is likely that this story was asked about (and answered successfully) more recently at: Student's written calculations beat other students using calculators Per that answer, it's called "Young Beaker" by J. T. Lamberty, Jr. and matches on the key details provided. The following summary is sourced from the linked answer and taken from Alex Kasman's ...


8

You might be looking for the book Manifold Space by Stephen Baxter. In it, he describes a two-dimensional life form (similar to a lichen) which exists and evolves on the surface of a neutron star (starting on page 115). It grows, evolves and dies in a repeating fourteen second cycle. The book itself is about the Fermi Paradox which asks the question ...


8

Since you want to limit the question to the Enterprise D; the "main computer" (which is actually a system of 2 redundant cores) uses isolinear chips and circuits to carry out the bulk of its tasks. These seem to conform to a traditional Turing machine, altough they are much faster than previous systems (such as duotronics). In Voyager, we have gel packs, ...


7

The description on the Futurama wiki seems to imply he created the proof while working on the episode: The Futurama theorem is a real-life mathematical theorem invented by Futurama writer Ken Keeler, who holds a PhD in applied mathematics, purely for use in the Season 6 episode "The Prisoner of Benda". It is the first known theorem to be created ...


7

Good afternoon! I am a teacher who first encountered this short story as part of a literature class at the University of Minnesota around 2000/2001. I continue to use it with my 6th and 7th graders. I teach at a middle school in the St. Louis area. I have also looked for years, trying to track down more information about this short story and its author. It's ...


7

Is it Jayden's Rescue (2002) by Vladimir Tumanov? I haven't seen the book, but I found this description at Amazon: Alex hates math. No matter how hard he tries, he can never get it right. Until one day he finds a magical book in which an evil wizard king has imprisoned a queen — and the only way to save her is with math! To rescue her, Alex and his ...


7

The dimensionality of space is a physical constant whose value in our universe is three. Worlds where this constant has other values (particularly two) are explored in the 1884 novel Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions by "A. Square" = Edwin Abbott Abbott, which is available at Project Gutenberg. From the Wikipedia plot summary: The story describes a ...


7

Are there any examples of a character failing to do something after being told how unlikely it is that they'll be able to do it successfully? Surely this has to be a definitive example. Obi-Wan Kenobi: It's over, Anakin! I have the high ground! Anakin Skywalker: You underestimate my power! Obi-Wan Kenobi: Don't try it.


6

Thanks to user14111, who suggested I post on BookSleuth Forum, where I received the following answer from Lee W. Kuivinen: It's "Problem Child" by Arthur Porges. It's in 10TH ANNUAL EDITION: THE YEAR'S BEST S-F edited by Judith Merril (1965). He entered the study, and walked to the desk. The top sheet lay there, mocking him—but what was this? The last ...


6

The game called EVE Online contains wormholes which are linking distant solar systems together. They are represented in the game as a 3 dimensional sphere which resembles a mirror. Here are two movies recorded by players showing off wormholes from close up: On a presentation made at the EVE ...


6

Your second question seems to come down to whether Enterprise D's computer is capable of hypercomputation. The question boils down to whether physics allows compressing an infinite amount of storage into a finite space and/or completing an infinite number of computation steps in finite time and energy. Nothing we've seen in the Trek universe so far, even ...


5

It's been a long time since I read it, but your description reminded me of Dragon's Egg by Robert L. Forward. It is about human explorers making contact with tiny flat creatures living on the surface of a neutron star. The main point of the novel is the communication difficulties with sentient creatures whose lifespans are just a few minutes.


5

We don't actually see it, no. But there is a numbers-related subject that Hermione claims is better than divination: Arithmancy. On Pottermore it's defined as "a magical discipline that studies the magical properties of numbers, including predicting the future with numbers and numerology" and "homework assignments of which included writing essays that ...


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