78

The title originates from the science fiction novella Blade Runner (a movie) by William S. Burroughs. According to Wikipedia: The term "blade runner" referred to a smuggler of medical supplies, e.g. scalpels. The history behind choosing the name is detailed in Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner by Paul M. Sammon: Fancher found a cinema treatment ...


23

"Why was Philip K Dick so distressed..." Easy answer; he wasn't. If you read Mike Scott's excellent answer, you will see that, although he never saw the completed version, what he did see impressed him significantly enough that he sent a glowingly complimentary letter to the production company, thanking them for their contribution to the field of SciFi, ...


21

I think it is clear that your first suggestion is correct. "Stooping down, Bruce picked one of the stubbled blue plants, then placed it in his right shoe, slipping it down out of sight. A present for my friends, he thought, and looked forward inside his mind, where no one could see, to Thanksgiving." I think this makes is clear that his "friends" ...


18

I do not believe there has ever been an official suggested order. The most common advice I have seen, which I agree with, is that chronologically may be your best bet (with some suggesting to avoid recent releases of very early work, where he had not yet found his voice). As time progressed, the combination of drug use and his growing paranoia led to his ...


17

Philip K. Dick only saw twenty minutes of the film before his death. According to Dick's close friend and confidante Maer Wilson (who spoke to him daily until his death) Philip Dick never saw the completed film. Philip K. Dick only met Ridley Scott one time – the day Phil was invited to view the special effects months prior to the Blade Runner ...


17

It's We Can Build You. Well, I think it is because my edition has on page 5: To Robert and Ginny Heinlein, whose kindness to us meant more than ordinary words can answer. However the edition on Amazon does not have this page. My edition is the 1994 one from Vintage Books/Random House while the one on Amazon is a 2012 edition from Mariner Books/Houghton ...


16

You're not the only person left confused. My viewpoint on it is that the story is a criticism of a few different concepts. Escapism Faced with harsh realities, the adults are too rigid to deal with the ruined world outside. Much like how a child in a bad situation will often retreat to their toys and dolls, trying to drown out the shouting downstairs with ...


16

Eye in the Sky, a 1957 novel by Philip K. Dick. From the Wikipedia summary: After an accident at the Belmont Bevatron, eight people are forced into several different alternate universes. These ersatz universes are later revealed to be solipsistic manifestations of each individual's innermost fears and prejudices, bringing the story in line with Dick's ...


16

In 1986, Asimov wrote an introduction to Dick’s story Impostor for Isaac Asimov Presents The Great SF Stories #15 (1953), and criticized him strongly for using drugs: I never met Philip Dick, but I heard that, at least early in his career, he experimented with what some people call “mind-expanding” drugs. I found that distasteful. In his autobiography I. ...


12

Fiction that is based on hard science and attempts to make real predictions about the future based on science and the scientific method is often called "Futurism", or "Speculative Fiction", or just "Hard Sci-fi". Asimov, Clarke, Frederik Pohl, and Poul Anderson have published examples of this. In the case of Blade Runner, the novel's title was the thesis ...


11

It's the short story "Holy Quarrel". The protagonist is a computer maintenance guy who is called by the secret service to decide whether a defense computer who is attempting to scramble SAC bombers to destroy a US city has gone crazy or is actually working as intended and has detected a subtle plot against the US. The computer is jammed to prevent it from ...


11

At the end of the novel The Man in the High Castle, However, the novel also lacks a complete resolution: Philip K Dick always planned to go back to it and write a sequel some day. From this interview (emphasis mine): But then when it came time to close down the novel the I Ching had no more to say. And so there’s no real ending on it. I like to regard it ...


10

An incredibly hard question to answer, as primarily the books themes are identity, drug culture and religion, and its hard as the book progresses to understand what is real and what is the result of exposure of the characters to the Chew-Z drug. Its clear from early in the novel that Palmer Eldritch is rescued from his crashed ship as he returns from the ...


10

"A Surface Raid" by Philip K. Dick, first published in Fantastic Universe, July 1955, which is available at the Internet Archive. Here is a plot summary from Philip K. Dick Review: Harl visits his father Edward Boynton. Harl tells his father that he came into some information during his educational activities, revealing that his father will be going to ...


8

Here's an excerpt of Time Out Joint from the blog called The Truth About Lies which contains a good review of the book as a launching point for an essay about Dick: Central problem in philosophy. Relation of word to object . . . what is a word? Arbitrary sign. But we live in words. Our reality, among words not things. No such thing as a thing anyhow; ...


8

At a very early part in the novel Philip K. Dick states clearly that: I am Horselover Fat, and I am writing this in the third person to gain much-needed objectivity. Then later in the novel Philip K Dick is brought to his senses by his meeting with the second coming of Valis, who he believes temporarily heals his mental problems. So as to the question ...


8

The quote is by Lucretius. In the translation of W.H. Mallock: "So likewise the walls of the great universe assailed on all sides shall suffer decay, and fall into mouldering ruin." --Book ii 1144, 1145, Lucretius on Life and Death: In the Metre of Omar Khayyam


8

If you read along a little further you'll find that this has been considered. A human with that little social empathy (e.g. none) wouldn't be able to function in society and would be immediately institutionalised but in theory, yes, you could get a false-positive out of someone who was deeply schizophrenic. “One day, a few weeks ago, I talked with Dave ...


7

Time Out of Joint Time Out of Joint is a dystopian novel by Philip K. Dick, first published in novel form in the United States in 1959. An abridged version was also serialised in the British science fiction magazine New Worlds Science Fiction in several installments from December 1959 to February 1960, under the title Biography in Time. -Wiki The ...


5

PKD is often prone to re-using a short story as a chapter in a book, or pulling a chapter of a book out and publishing it as a short story. Since he often re-used themes between his works, comparing them can shed light. Perky Pat is a side plotline from the Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch which goes into more detail about how Perky Pat layouts are used. ...


5

In a word, no. As far as I'm aware, Ron Moore has never credited the works of Philip K. Dick as being the genesis for the new BSG series. When asked to cites the inspiration behind the reimagined BSG, Ron Moore has consistently stated that his intention behind the human-cylon hybrids was to reflect the post 9/11 paranoia that gripped America; The initial ...


5

Paul Williams, author of "Only Apparently Real:The World of Philip K. Dick", may be your best source when it comes to finding some of the lesser known writings of Philip K. Dick. I was able to locate him in the King County Library System.


5

PKD's strong suit is the surreal collapse of ordinary life. He wrote an essay about it called "How to Build a Universe That Doesn't Fall Apart Two Days Later". He gets into this a deeper in the Exegesis and there isn't a singular "right" answer. In one way he is lampooning the mid-century obsession with neat little labels for everything, especially when ...


5

Your question gave me an excuse to reread the book - not that I needed much of an excuse as I love (most of) Philip K. Dick's books. Anyhow, I can't see the logic behind the paper slips. They don't seem to fit the story at all. I wonder if Dick originally intended the town to be partly a hallucination imposed on Gumm, and then changed his mind halfway ...


4

Amazon has produced another series called Electric Dreams, which is an anthology-type series of episodes inspired by Dick. We finished watching the first season on Amazon Prime. The flavor is Philip K. Dick, but the episodes do not stick closely to the stories. The end of "Autofac", for example, is very different from the story.


4

Yes, the entire answer is a spoiler.


4

Earth is dying, and the U.N. is actively trying to get everyone to emigrate to colonies and a personal android for colonists is part of the incentive to go. That had been the ultimate incentive of emigration: the android servant as carrot, the radioactive fallout as stick. The U.N. had made it easy to emigrate, difficult if not impossible to stay. If ...


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