175

Yes. There are a few quotes by C.S. Lewis relating to Aslan and Jesus. In a letter to a young girl named Sophia, Lewis writes, "I don't say. 'Let us represent Christ as Aslan.' I say, 'Supposing there was a world like Narnia, and supposing, like ours, it needed redemption, let us imagine what sort of Incarnation and Passion and Resurrection Christ would ...


108

Matt Fraction, the writer of "Invincible Iron Man" has explicitly stated in interviews that Tony Stark is indeed an atheist: The Iron Man story in Fear Itself, there’s a cataclysm that befalls one of Tony’s favorite cities in the world, and he goes to investigate it. As the Avengers resources are split, and they’re running around the world dealing ...


79

The religion seems to be gaining power, as the priests gain actual powers. This is an interesting question, and I suspect that it'll be explored more in future books and that it's deliberate that all we have right now are clues. But there's enough in those clues to tell us that the thing that makes Red Priests presently so impressive was, up until recently, ...


77

In the "modern day" era of the Song of Ice and Fire there are quite a few different religions, but figuring out how many "gods" there are is a bit tricky. On Westeros (the continent where most of the non-Danaerys scenes take place) the primary religion is the Faith of the Seven; this is the official religion of the Seven Kingdoms as a whole, though not all ...


71

I don't think it's really as complicated as some of the other answers (and comments) suggest. The British, by and large, consider the secular celebration of Christmas to be part of their cultural tradition; the fact that some people celebrate it as a religious holiday has always been perfectly acceptable, of course, but was not traditionally considered a ...


58

First of all; there is no proof about Tony Stark and his religious tendencies presented to us in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. However, as a scientist with a skeptical mind, it is more likely than usual that Tony Stark is not a religious man and in this instance I believe that a lack of proof is more likely to mean he is an atheist, rather than a theist. ...


52

The story about the Tibetan monks who want to find the name of god is "The Nine Billion Names of God" by Arthur Clarke.


48

There is evidence in Age of Ultron that suggests Stark is an atheist (at least in as much as he does not believe in the Christian god). Some Christians express their religious convictions by using a bumper sticker proclaiming the centrality of Jesus Christ in their lives: Here is a screen cap from the latest Avengers movie (roughly 13 minutes in), showing ...


48

Doubtful Tolkien wrote in a footnote to Letter 153 that Hobbits had no practice of worship or prayer: There are thus no temples or 'churches' or fanes in this 'world' among 'good' peoples. They had little or no 'religion' in the sense of worship. [...] I do not think Hobbits practised any form of worship or prayer (unless through exceptional contact with ...


47

There's obviously no canon answer. But there is a lot of indication that at least some wizards are Christians, outside of Christmas celebrations. Rowling has said that Hogwarts is a "multifaith school." It's safe to assume that for most of its thousand-year history, the primary of those faiths would be the almost universal faith of the United Kingdom and ...


42

I can't give you a page or a reference or link, but I can tell you this was told to me by Ronald D. Moore, under a professional situation. When I was pitching to Star Trek: The Next Generation I had a couple stories that dealt with the effects on the Enterprise crew due to the religious beliefs of other beings. In one case, I had a story I pitched about an ...


39

While the question doesn't provide a timeframe, I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest that it's Heinlein's Orphans of the Sky. The first part, Universe, appeared in Astounding Science Fiction in May 1941. Part II, Common Sense, appears in ASF in Oct 1941. The two were published together in 1963. Universe was also published separately in 1951. It's ...


39

This is Philip Jose Farmer's "A Bowl Bigger Than Earth " which was first published in If, September 1967. Your description is spot-on. (Here's a link to an online version.) It's been published a few other places -- the most accessible in book forms is probably Down in the Black Gang. See ISFDB for details. It's a very odd story.


35

I saw on neilgaimanboard.com some one suggesting the following: The "forgettable god" should be Mercury. More explicitly, the "forgettable god" should be a Hindu deity named Budha, the son of the moon god Soma and Tara, the wife of Brihaspati, or Jupiter. Budha is one of the navagraha (literal nine-planets), or planet-gods in Vedic astrology; ...


34

There are, to the best of my memory, no instances of wizard-raised wizards mentioning religion at all in the books. As you stated, many of them do celebrate Christmas, and one might think that if there was some form of Jewish, Pagan, Muslim, or other Muggle faith with a winter holiday prevalent in the wizarding world, Harry would have heard about it. On the ...


34

R'hllor is very prominent on Essos, where the religion is based. There the red priests are born and gain their station; only a few have come to Westeros. For example, Thoros is from Myr and Melisandre is from Asshai. The religion is new, so it hasn't caught on in Westeros yet. This is a key factor, but even had it existed a century before, it's likely ...


33

The entire galaxy seems to have suffered an immense bout of amnesia about the Jedi - people who could have and should have known Jedi act as if they have no knowledge of them at all. All that most people know of them, especially people who never saw or interacted of them before the Empire rose, is what they've heard. The Jedi were an exclusive order, known ...


33

As far as I can tell, they're not directly analogous. Many of the things that are "abominations" to Nuggan are explictly allowed under Scientology (see below). If anything, Nugganism appears to be a reflection of the state of Turkmenistan, where their eccentric ruler; Saparmurat Niyazov banned beards, gold teeth, the keeping of dogs and cats, lip-syncing, ...


30

This relates to the very touching story of Proudwing, as Stannis relates it to Davos. "When I was a lad I found an injured goshawk and nursed her back to health. Proudwing, I named her. She would perch on my shoulder and flutter from room to room after me and take food from my hand, but she would not soar. Time and again I would take her hawking, ...


30

There are three main elements here. There are were no Jewish students at Hogwarts. Bear with me before you start yelling. One day, JKR waved her magic twitter-wand (long, long after she'd finished writing the books) and deemed one of the students to be Jewish. Since there are no Jewish students mentioned in the books, there's no need for the whole school ...


29

Appears to be "Yes" I haven't found a primary source for this, but numerous secondary sources claim that Lewis once wrote: '[Aslan] is an invention giving an imaginary answer to the question, "What might Christ become like if there really were a world like Narnia, and He chose to be incarnate and die and rise again in that world as He actually has done ...


26

On Earth #19999 Marvel Cinema Earth's Captain America religion has not been explicitly stated, but it is mentioned he is a monotheist and most likely Christian. On Earth #616 The Captain America of the canon Marvel Earth #616 has been listed as devoutly Protestant. Images of Earth #616's Captain America engaged in religious activity are limited partially ...


25

Firstly, let's address the "witch" issue. Melisandre certainly does wield magic. Her power is not just given from R'hllor, it's something she studied (along with all of the other Red Priests). Their belief is that the magic comes from R'hllor, as a gift to them, but they must still learn to wield it. So, depending on your definition, she is a "witch", ...


25

Catholics (and Christians generally) see the universe as the handiwork of God, and therefore essentially Good. However Satan introduced Evil and seeks to set himself up as better than his creator. The parallels between this and the creation of Middle Earth by Illuvatar at the start of the Silmarillion are very plain. Illuvatar is God, Melkor is Satan, and ...


24

1940: The earliest source I know of for the "Gods Require Belief" idea is Lester del Rey's short story "The Pipes of Pan", first published in the Unknown Fantasy Fiction, May 1940, available at the Internet Archive. Pan burying his last worshiper: Pan's great shoulders drooped as he wiped the last of the earth from his hands. Experimentally, he chirped ...


24

It's Sandkings by George R. R. Martin. The critters see the owner as a god and build statues of his face in the sand.


24

From The Unofficial Redwall FAQ: Is there religion in Redwall? No. Although the terms "abbey", "abbot" and "abbess" are usually associated with the Roman Catholic Church, Brian Jacques has said repeatedly that there is no religion in Redwall. He chose an abbey with an abbot or abbess instead of a castle with a king or queen because he wanted a friendly,...


23

There is no hard evidence in the world of A Song of Ice and Fire that any gods actually exist. There is plenty of evidence magic, or at least something magic-like, does exist: the Others, the wights, the greenseers, the wargs, the warlocks from Qarth, the Faceless Men, the "shadow babies" conjured by Melisandre, the resurrection powers shown by some red ...


22

Some other gods: The Great Shepherd or lamb god is the deity of the peaceful Lhazareen. They are taught that all men are one flock. The Old Man of the River is a lesser god of the Rhoynar. He is the son of Mother Rhoyne and his form is that of a giant turtle. He fights the Crab King for dominion of all life below the flowing water. (In "A Dance with ...


22

It is unlikely that any of the well-known actors made such statements. Your premise is not entirely correct. Roddenberry's thoughts are well known, but they didn't always translate to the screen. The very post you link to about Earth religions gives several examples of religion/spirituality throughout Trek (mostly from after his death). The producers and ...


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