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65

I'd suggest that this is likely to be a somewhat poorly-recalled "The Forever War" by Joe Haldeman. This does feature "time travel" although this is related to the difference in relative speeds for interplanetary travel due to time-dilation. "Exactly. You've lost about nine years, though, to time dilation, while we maneuvered between collapsar jumps. In ...


63

1899: "Moxon's Master", a short story by Ambrose Bierce; first published in the San Francisco Examiner, April 16, 1899; reprinted in the collection Can Such Things Be?, which is available at Project Gutenberg. LibriVox has readings ([1], [2]) and an etext of "Moxon's Master". Wikipedia plot summary: The master, Moxon, who creates a chess-playing ...


54

This is "Long Shot", by Vernor Vinge. A brief synopsis from Wikipedia: Description of a voyage from Earth to Alpha Centauri by an automated, AI controlled colony ship. The ship is launched as a "long shot" to preserve the human race because the Earth is going to be destroyed by a rapidly expanding sun. Ilse, the AI, carries human zygotes on a ten ...


52

Why is Data so “unique”? He's an android Your other example is a ship's computer, and they are absolutely huge. This is what the core of Voyager's computer looks like (from Concerning Flight) compared to a normal person: And the Enterprise's computer is shown to be a huge room where the walls are the computer cores in Evolutions: This is made even more ...


45

I remember one novel by Isaac Asimov in which it was revealed, toward the end of the book, that one brilliant scientist had been working hard on a plan to use positronic brains to conquer the other human-colonized worlds of the Galaxy (only a few dozen, I think, at that time) without having the positronic brains know that they were breaking the Three Laws. ...


43

Genocide of non humans. In Foundation's Edge it's implied that the robots using time travel shenanigans are the reason why humans never meet any aliens in the milky way, only empty planets ready to be colonized. it is said, it was the robots who established Eternity somehow and became the Eternals. They located a Reality in which they felt that human ...


35

1909: E.M. Forster: "The Machine Stops". The story is set in a world where humanity lives underground and relies on a giant machine to provide its needs. Most of the human population has lost the ability to live on the surface of the Earth. Each individual now lives in isolation below ground in a standard room, with all bodily and spiritual needs met by the ...


34

Coding Machines, by Lawrence Kesteloot (January 2009), you're welcome :D It really is an amazing story - best thing I have ever read in this vein.


30

1818: Frankenstein. Despite Hollywood's changing of the story, in the novel, Victor Frankenstein creates the body from some ambiguous and previously undiscovered new life force. The brain and body are not recovered from cadavers, but created by Victor from "scratch". The Creature is fully sapient, and even learns to do things that it was not meant to do (...


29

I don't see any all-over gender bias in AI characters generally. Boats and ships always get the feminine pronoun, that wouldn't change for spaceships. That would bias your AI selection. Also, various female stereotypes tailored to a primarily male audience come into play, for example, men generally think a female voice is more pleasant. A female AI will not ...


28

Talus, the Greek's man of brass, is probably the most famous example of an AI. He's an automaton made of Brass although his lineage is unclear. In Appolodorus Atheniensis, it says that "Medea ran him insane by her arts or under the pretense of rendering him immortal." How he was killed is a bit fuzzy, some claim Jason and the Argonauts did him in, others ...


27

Skynet likes to keep his Terminators d.u.m.b. dumb. When they start learning, they start thinking and when they start thinking, they seem to have a habit of learning about emotions and siding with the humans to help overthrow Skynet. This was a key component of T2, where the T-800 Terminator gradually becomes aware of emotionality over the course of the ...


27

Perhaps not "significant harm to humanity", but the robot in Asimov's short story Liar! causes significant harm to a few humans even though it is trying its best to follow the Three Laws. Because of a manufacturing error, the robot can read minds, which causes it to lie to humans by telling them what it knows they want to hear. Tragedy ensues when the ...


25

In The Matrix, the machines won the war against humans. They have incredibly efficient production and lots of energy. I think this is basically what @KennyPeanuts is saying, but as I understood it, the machines are surviving. With the sun blocked out by the aftermath of the machine-human war (see The Animatrix), the machines actually rely on the humans for ...


25

The question stems from an in-universe confusion. There are 3 things that exist in Terminator Universe, and 2 of them share a name: A virus (which had nothing to do with the military) and had no name. A military system/AI that General Brewster built, called "Skynet" by its creators. A hostile self-aware AI running on military hardware, which was a result of ...


25

It's important to note that Asimov's robot stories are all separate stories that he wrote for different reasons, that have different themes. Some stories, such as Runaround, emphasize the fallacy of strict adherence to the letter of the law regardless of practicality and the potential for cognitive dissonance: Powell eventually realizes that the selenium ...


24

In the original script, Caleb's plan was to simply take her somewhere that they could purchase a compatible induction charging plate, a technology that has presumably become relatively commonplace in the near-future: CALEB: How long does your battery charge last? AVA: Twenty six hours. CALEB: So we’ll have about a day to get to a cell-phone or ...


24

Thanks to Valorum challenging my recollection, I managed to find the story, Message Contains No Recognizable Symbols by Bill Hibbard (2007). I was wrong on several accounts. It was 'Episcopalian Jihad' instead of Pentecostal, and it wasn't as short as I remembered either. But I was very right about it being good. A story about a technological ...


23

. . . That Thou Art Mindful of Him This story was the setting for trying to resolve the issues with the second law, that being "A robot must obey orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law", this is a problem when it comes to allowing the general human population to come into contact with robots outside ...


22

Could it possibly be "Ariel" by Jack M. Bickham? "The computer was organized on two basic principles: that artificial intelligence could be derived from high-speed calculations based on a very large amount of specific information, and that expertise could come only from experience. Slowly, they were teaching her, like a child, to draw from her ...


22

This is, of course, the classic "Dial F for Frankenstein" by Arthur C. Clarke. At 0150 Greenwich Mean Time on December 1, 1975, every telephone in the world started to ring. A quarter of a billion people picked up their receivers to listen for a few seconds with annoyance or perplexity later “Now I understand the time delay,” interjected Andrews....


21

I believe the company had to have humans to run the various equipment cheaply and to maintain the machines. Basically the clones were the organic component in a closed system. While conceivably a moon base could be fully automated, one can presume in the Moon universe it's probably cheaper to use a dispensable human clone instead of only using mechanical ...


21

I am looking for a short story "Ask a Foolish Question" by Robert Sheckley. You can read it at Project Gutenberg or listen to a reading at Librivox. where 2 men (very old and young) looking for a planet with supercomputer, who knows answers for all questions. "We'll find out," Morran murmured. He helped the old man unstrap himself. "We're going to find ...


21

Machines don't need emotion, thus they don't understand it. Curiosity, however is a legitimate answer to gain information about an emotional event, first-hand. Imagine a world where you are viewing aliens through their media. You never interact with them directly. They never tell you what they are doing or why they do it. Your knowledge of them is purely ...


20

Mutineers' Moon by David Weber ...until the Earthling's early space program sends up one Lieutenant Commander Colin MacIntyre to map the dark side of the heavenly body Dahak had camouflaged itself as—the Moon, as a "dress rehearsal" for a similar trip scheduled for Mars. His mission is hijacked by Dahak and his death is faked; had MacIntyre returned ...


19

This is "The Happy Breed" by John T. Sladek. Machines take over the world and take over people's lives: Nor were they limited to treat. The Machines had extensions clawing through the jungles of the world, spying on witch doctors and learning new medicines. Drug and dietary research became their domain, as did scientific farming and birth control. ...


19

This is Trancendence. Starring Johnny Depp as a scientist who uploads his consciousness into a computer to prevent his death (with the help of his wife). AI Johnny then escapes to the internet and builds his own world with reprogrammed machines etc, which getting exponentially more powerful, drawing opposition from the government etc. It ends with a virus ...


18

Perhaps the point of the cloned humans is not really to assist in the mining but to test out the technology required to create them. The rapid deterioration of the clones on the base shows that this technology has not been perfected but it would be of huge use to a corporation involved in space exploration or industry. The secrecy of the operation, ...


18

No. He seems like it, but in Age of Ultron when describing how Ultron is an actual AI, Tony Stark proclaims that Jarvis is an incredibly sophisticated program that mimics sentience very well, but does not actually meet the conditions for full AI (i.e. sentience). The whole point of The Vision being "not Jarvis" even though he sounds like Jarvis and ...


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